‘THE SAGE’-Klein’s Online Newsletter—JULY 2024
Klein’s Floral & Greenhouses
3758 E. Washington Ave.
Madison, WI 53704
608/244-5661 or info@kleinsfloral.com

 

THIS MONTH’S HIGHLIGHTS:
Klein’s Supports Olbrich’s 2024 Home Garden Tour, July 12 & 13
Our ‘Mad Gardener‘ and ‘Houseplant Help‘ Are Ready for Your Questions
Klein’s Favorite Seed, Bulb & Plant Sources
We Reuse Your Teal-colored 5″ Klein’s Pots
A Checklist For Ordering Flowers from Klein’s
What’s the Deal With the ‘Chelsea Chop’?
A Beneficial Predator/Scavenger in the Garden: The Daddy-longlegs
You Asked About Reddish Hydrangea Foliage
Plant of the Month: The Tomato
Klein’s Favorite Roasted Eggplant Salad Recipes
Product Spotlight: Bonide® Mosquito Beater
Notes from Rick’s Garden Journal—From June 2024
—The Genus Silphium
—The Scoop on Nightshades
—From Worlds Apart, But Together in My Garden
July in the Garden: A Planner
Gardening Events Around Town
Review Klein’s @: Yelp, Google Reviews or Facebook Reviews
Join Us on Twitter
Follow Us on Facebook

 

CURRENTLY ON SALE @ KLEIN’S

 

Fill-A-Cart Sale…Grab one of our green shopping carts and load as many 5″ annuals as you can on it without stacking for $100! We have an excellent selection remaining. There is a lot of summer left to enjoy more plants!

 

All spring annual and vegetable cell packs (2/3/4/6), fiber pots and full flats are now “Buy 1, Get 1 FREE”

 

Then beginning Thursday, July 4:
50% Off Annual Hanging Baskets and Annual Flower Pouches (Houseplants are not included.)
50% Off Garden Spinners and Decorative Garden Stakes
50% Off Garden Flags
50% Off Rugs
50% Off Tropicals (Houseplants are not included.)

 

KLEIN’S IS A PROUD SUPPORTER OF THE 2024 OLBRICH HOME GARDEN TOUR being held Friday, July 12 and Saturday, July 13 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tickets are $15 for Olbrich members and $17 for the general public, $7 for children ages 6-12 and free for children 5 and under.

 

Olbrich’s 2024 Home Garden Tour features Seven Gardens in Sun Prairie

 

Just a hop, skip, and jump north of Madison, Olbrich Botanical Gardens presents seven unique gardens in Sun Prairie. Working with nature, the gardeners incorporate native trees and shrubs to establish the backbone of the garden, while pops of colorful pollinator plants support a variety of beneficial insects and songbirds. Navigate the tour route with ease and learn more about featured native plants, by using the Home Garden Tour app, accessible by QR code on the tour ticket.

 

Advance tickets available for purchase at Olbrich’s lobby thru July 11.

 

Tour day ticket sales July 12 & 13, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., 5236 Preservation Place, Sun Prairie, WI 53590 (featured garden). This is a private residence, tickets are only available during tour hours.

 

Visit www.olbrich.org for more information.

 

HAVE YOU MOVED RECENTLY?
If so, we ask that as we go into the busy spring season, you update your new address in association with Klein’s Rewards Program so you continue to receive all possible benefits.

 

In addition to occasional coupons, we’ve been mailing out birthday month postcards with an added gift during the past year or so and find that many are being returned with an invalid address. We don’t want you to miss out!

 

If your address has recently changed, please send your new information to info@kleinsfloral.com and please include your name and your old address as reference.

 

WE STERILIZE AND REUSE YOUR TEAL-COLORED 5″ KLEIN’S POTS
Due to costs, we are unable to reuse most plastic pots and trays and never those from other retailers. But we are happy to take back and reuse the teal-colored 5″ Klein’s pots and their accompanying trays. Simply bring in your cleaned out pots and trays and drop them off with the associates at the checkout counters or in the bin along the building. We ask that you recycle or dispose of all other pots, containers and trays in compliance with your municipality’s guidelines. We do not reuse the plant identification tags.

 

Madison is currently NOT accepting rigid plastics (flower pots and trays) for recycling due to import restrictions enacted by China for scrap material. At present, there is no end market to accept the type of plastic scrap the mixed rigid plastic program produces. Until further notice, rigid plastics are to be placed in the refuse bins for disposal.

 

THE MAD GARDENER
Madison’s Firsthand Source for Expert Gardening Advice

 

Ask any of your gardening questions by e-mailing them to us at madgardener@kleinsfloral.com. Klein’s in-house Mad Gardener will e-mail you with an answer as promptly as we can. We’ve also posted a link on our home page and in our contacts for your convenience. Your question might then appear in the “You Asked” feature of our monthly newsletter. If your question is the one selected for our monthly newsletter, you’ll receive a small gift from us at Klein’s.

 

Sorry, we can only answer those questions pertaining to gardening in Southern Wisconsin and we reserve the right to leave correspondence unanswered at our discretion. Please allow 2-3 days for a response.

 

KLEIN’S ‘HOUSEPLANT HELP’
You can contact Klein’s in-house indoor plant experts by emailing to houseplanthelp@kleinsfloral.com for sound information and advice regarding indoor tropicals, succulents, blooming plants and so much more.

 

For many years, customers’ indoor plant questions have been directed to Klein’s Mad Gardener. Now you have the opportunity to contact our indoor plant experts directly. We’ve posted a link on our home page and in our contacts for your convenience. Your question might then appear in the “You Asked” feature of our monthly newsletter. If your question is the one selected for our monthly newsletter, you’ll receive a small gift from us at Klein’s.

 

We reserve the right to leave correspondence unanswered at our discretion. Please allow 2-3 days for a response.

 

JULY STORE HOURS:
Monday thru Friday : 9:00-6:00
Saturday: 9:00-5:00
Sunday: 10:00-4:00

 

Open Thursday, July 4: 10:00-4:00

 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:
Throughout July, visit Klein’s and check out our specials on annuals, vegetables, hanging baskets and containers. Specials and selection change weekly so check our home page @ www.kleinsfloral.com or our social media sites (Click on the links at the top of our homepage). We pride ourselves in having the best cared for plants in even the hottest weather and throughout the month we’ll continue to offer a full selection of annuals, perennials and shrubs.

 

July 4–Independence Day. Special Store Hours: 10:00-4:00. Check out special savings on select items. Selection is excellent and quality remains top notch. Visit our website for current specials. Make Klein’s your first stop en route to any Fourth of July celebration you might have.

 

July 7–Islamic New Year

 

July 12 & 13Olbrich Garden’s 2023 Home Garden Tour. See above for details or visit www.olbrich.org for more information.

 

July 21–Full Moon

 

‘THE FLOWER SHOPPE’:
A Checklist For Ordering Flowers from Klein’s:

 

—When ordering floral gifts, describe the recipient’s personality type, as well as his/her favorite hobbies or colors if you know them. Klein’s designers; Sarah, Renee or Sue, can match the floral arrangement with the recipient’s personality.

 

—Tell us if the gift is for a special occasion (birthday, anniversary or other personal milestone). We can offer suggestions on how to best celebrate with flowers.

 

—If the flowers are for decorating or entertaining, describe the environment where the arrangement will be placed so our designer can create an arrangement that complements the style and colors of of the event.

 

—Consider bringing in your own vase or container for an added personal touch.

 

—Ask us for specific colors or color themes.

 

—Let Klein’s know if you prefer a mixed flower arrangement or an arrangement made up of just one type of flower.

 

—Be ready to provide us with the necessary basic information:
◦Name
◦Full address and phone number of the recipient
◦The delivery date
◦Your card message. See below for some common card message options.
◦Payment information

 

Whether sending flowers across the country or around the corner, Klein’s provides the expertise, convenience and service today’s on-the-go consumers are looking for.

 

Common Card Message Options:

 

For a Birthday—
•Celebrating you!
•Wishing you a year filled with the same joy you bring to others!
•Hoping your wishes come true year after year.
•Like a fine wine, you improve each year.
•The day you were born is a daily celebration.
•Wishing you a very happy birthday . . . and many more!
•You’re not getting older, you’re getting better.
•May today be filled with sunshine and smiles, laughter and love.
•Love on your birthday and everyday.
•Enjoy this gift that’s as beautiful as the birthday girl herself.

 

As a Get Well—
•Hoping these flowers brighten not only your room, but your heart.
•Loving thoughts are tucked inside this bundle of flowers!
•Good health starts with a happy heart. Hope these flowers start the job!
•Hope you’re back on your feet soon.
•Hoping that you’ll bloom again soon.
•Sending you healing thoughts and a little sunshine to brighten your day.
•Sending you some get well cheer!
•To brighten your day!
•Loving relief for your aches and pains.
•Wishing you a speedy recovery.
•We miss you! Come back soon!
•Hope you’re feeling better soon.

 

Love & Romance—
•All my love.
•Love and kisses.
•You take my breath away…today and every day.
•With you it’s Valentine’s Day 365 days a year.
•I send a kiss inside the petals of each rose…
•You are the love of my life.
•You are the reason I’m alive.
•”True love is friendship set on fire.” (French Proverb)
•Roses are red, violets are blue, what would I do without you!?
•Always and forever.
•I wish there were more ways to say all that you are to me. Love always.
•My heart is filled with love for you.
•Flowers today. Fireworks tonight!
•I usually tell you “I love you” two or three times a day. Today I’ll make it a dozen.
•How sweet it is to be loved by you!
•If actions speak louder than words, this is my way of shouting.
•I don’t need a holiday to say I love you.
•I’m delivering you a kiss to last all week.

 

For a New Baby—
•Congratulations! May your baby be blessed, his/her road forward a blessed adventure!
•We share in your celebration of the new life you created!
•We welcome your dear new child to this world with love.
•Congratulations, and enjoy the years together!
•A little one brings so much fun!
•Enjoy this special time!
•Babies are special, babies are fun, congratulations on your new little one!
•Welcome to the family!
•I’m not an expert on babies yet, but I sure can take care of Mom!
•Another miracle in this world. Welcome!

 

Sympathy—
•Please know our loving thoughts embrace you.
•Please accept these flowers and hear the words we are not able to speak.
•My thoughts and prayers are with you.
•Thinking of you in these difficult times.
•May the peace that comes from the memories of love shared comfort you now and in the days ahead.
•Our hearts are filled with sorrow.
•We’re sharing your sorrow.
•With deepest sympathy.
•In loving memory.
•With heartfelt condolences.
•Fondest remembrances.
•May you take comfort in knowing there is one more angel above us.
•You are in our thoughts and prayers.

 

Source: The Society of American Florists website @ safnow.org/aboutflowers/

 

YOU ASKED. . .
I spoke with someone at Kleins yesterday and she suggested I email you about my hydrangeas. The leaves are turning a reddish color around the edges and I’m wondering if I need to do anything about it. Kat

 

Hi Kat,
Typically red edges on hydrangea leaves indicates that direct sunlight is hitting them at some point during the day. Hydrangeas planted in more sun show more red highlights in the leaves than those in more shade. The leaves in the photos you sent look otherwise healthy so I don’t believe there’s any need to worry. We’ve certainly had plenty of rain so that is not an issue this season. Drought can also promote reddish or purplish leaves.

 

Thanks for your question,

 

DID YOU KNOW. . .
. . . about the Chelsea Chop means of pruning to control the height and flower power of select perennials?

 

The following very informative article for perennial gardeners appeared a number of years back in an issue of Fine Gardening magazine.

 

What’s the Deal With the Chelsea Chop?
By Danielle Sherry

 

Pretty much any gardening book that’s worth its salt mentions the Chelsea Chop—but most do only that. The introduction of the concept is usually followed by some variation of this sentence: “Cut the plants back by a third or half to delay bloom and limit size.” But the how, why, and what are rarely discussed. The Chelsea Chop can be used to great effect if you’re trying to create peak season combinations. It often allows you to ensure that plants which don’t normally bloom in tandem with each other reach their peak at a similar time. There are several other benefits too, as well as some drawbacks.

 

What is it?
The Chelsea Chop is a method of pruning that limits the size, controls the flowering season, and often decreases the flopping of a number of herbaceous perennials.

 

When do I do it?
The Chelsea Chop got its name from the famous garden show that takes place in England in late May— which is historically when the pruning method should be used. However, depending on where you live in the country, the chopping is best done in late spring or early summer, or when the plant has a fairly substantial amount of vegetative growth.

 

What is the upside?
Typically plants aren’t as tall or leggy, so they may not need to be staked or supported. The flowers may be smaller but in many cases are more numerous. This happens because the removal of the top shoots enables the side shoots to branch out more.

 

Are there drawbacks?
You can’t do the chop on all summer-blooming plants— for instance, woody subshrubs don’t respond well. Also, if your spring has been particularly dry, performing such a drastic pruning may do more harm than good to your plants, sending them into a shock that they may not recover from.

 

What plants are ideal candidates?
Many summer- and autumn-flowering perennials, such as these, are perfect for the Chelsea Chop.

 

Garden phlox (Phlox paniculata and cvs., Zones 4–9)
Yarrow (Achillea spp. and cvs., Zones 3–9)
Bellflower (Campanula spp. and cvs., Zones 4–9)
Aster (Symphyotrichum spp. and cvs., Zones 4–8)
Coneflower (Echinacea spp. and cvs., Zones 3–9)
Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia spp. and cvs., Zones 3–9)
Upright sedum (Hylotelephium spp. and cvs., Zones 3–7)
Penstemon (Penstemon spp. and cvs., Zones 3–8)
Golden marguerite (Anthemis tinctoria and cvs., Zones 3–7)
Sneezeweed (Helenium spp. and cvs., Zones 3–8)
Goldenrod (Solidago spp. and cvs., Zones 3–9)
Shasta daisy (Leucanthemum × superbum and cvs., Zones 5–9)

 

How do I do it?
There are two ways to do this simple pruning.

 

Method 1: Chop back clumps of perennials by one-third to one-half using shears. This will delay the flowering until later in summer and keep plants shorter and more compact.

 

Method 2: Cut only half the stems back on a plant, which will extend the season of flowering rather than delay it.

 

 

PRODUCT SPOTLIGHTEach month we spotlight some product that we already carry or one that we’ve taken note of and plan to carry in the near future. Likewise, if you would like to see Klein’s to carry a product that we don’t currently, please let us know. Our goal is to be responsive to the marketplace and to our loyal clientele. If a product fits into our profile, we will make every effort to get it into our store. In addition, we may be able to special order an item for you, whether plant or hard good, given enough time.

 

Bonide® Mosquito Beater
Given the abundance of rain during June, (Madison’s 6th wettest June ever!) we can look forward to a bumper crop of mosquitoes in the weeks ahead. Klein’s offers a number of mosquito control products including the following products from Bonide®:

 

Mosquito Beater Granules
Effectively repels for up to 3 weeks. Biodegradable and pleasantly scented. Easy to use shaker applicators. Enjoy mosquito free surroundings, any place, any time. Available in two sizes.

 

-Repels mosquitoes and other listed insects outdoors
-People & pet safe, when used as directed
-Perfect for backyard parties, BBQ’s and more
-Lasts up to 3 weeks
-Just sprinkle out on the ground

 

Mosquito Beater Ready-to-Spray
BONIDE Mosquito Beater® Kills and repels mosquitoes, flies, gnats, and other listed insects. It has a long-lasting and pleasant scent. Simply attach to your garden hose and apply.

 

-Kills and repels mosquitoes in outdoor areas
-Lasts for up to 4 weeks
-Contact and residual spray
-Kills mosquitoes that may carry/transmit the Zika Virus
-Easy to use
-Ready to Spray quart (32oz) treats up to 5,000 sq. ft.

 

NOTES FROM MY GARDEN JOURNAL–Tips and Observations from My Own Garden by Rick Halbach

 

ENTRY: JUNE 19, 2024 (The Genus Silphium)
One group of perennials I treasure for their stature and impressive beauty are those from the Silphium genus of Wisconsin native prairie plants. The most well-known members of these members of the aster family include compass plant (Silphium laciniatum), cup plant (S. perfoliatum), prairie dock (S. terebinthinaceum) and rosinweed (S. integrifolium). Plants from this group are extremely rugged, tall and dramatic and add a lot of flare to the back of my perennial border out back. Flowers from all species are yellow and set high up on thick stalks and all attract tons beneficial insects and birds to the garden.

 

Compass Plant is a tall, coarse, sunflower-like perennial, growing 3-12 ft. high. Deeply cut, hairy leaves, up to 2 ft. in length, usually orient themselves north and south to avoid the heat of the noonday sun. Scattered along the top half of the stout, sticky stem are 2-5 in. wide, yellow, radiate flowers. A tall plant bearing yellow flower heads with large, hairy-edged, green bracts; stem exudes resinous sap.

 

Cup Plant is a course perennial, 3-6 ft. tall with numerous large, yellow composite flowers. Each flower head has 20-30 yellow rays and darker yellow disks. Stout leaves are joined at stem to form a small cup that holds water and attracts birds, especially goldfinches.

 

The very large, wide, spade-shaped basal leaves of Prairie Dock subtend a 3-8 ft. flowering stalk. Bright yellow, composite flower are numerous on older plants. Another common name for prairie dock is Prairie Rosinweed due to the copious resin exuded from injured parts of the plant. Prairie youngsters used the resin for chewing gum. It tastes like carrots and pine.

 

Wholeleaf Rosinweed is a coarse perennial, 2-6 ft. tall with large, yellow composite flowers and rough, paired, oval to lance-shaped leaves.

* * * * *

ENTRY: JUNE 20, 2024 (The Scoop on Nightshades)
Going through some old magazines today, I came across the following article in the newest issue of Eating Well magazine.

 

The Scoop on Nightshades
By Julie Stewart

 

Tomatoes, eggplants, okra, potatoes and all manner of peppers (bell and otherwise): these familiar produce picks are members of the nightshade family. Like other fruits and veggies, they pack plenty of beneficial nutrients like cholesterol-reducing lycopene in tomatoes and potatoes’ blood-pressure-lowering potassium. So why are they non grata in some diets?

 

Nightshades contain compounds (such as glycoalkaloids and tropane alkaloids) that nightshade opponents claim increase inflammation in the body, leading to health issues. “In high concentrations, these compounds are quite toxic,” says Gauray Moghe, Ph.D., an assistant professor of plant biology at Cornell University. (They’re what make ornamental nightshades like petunias unfit to eat.) While edible nightshades also have some of these same compounds, he says the levels are so teeny that they’re harmless for the majority of healthy individuals and no solid research suggests otherwise.

 

Some folks with inflammatory conditions, such as eczema, psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease, report feeling better after nixing nightshades, but the research is far from definitive. In some studies, participants eliminated multiple food groups—so, was it the nightshades or something else? Plus, some improvements were self-reported.

 

Bottom line: If you have an inflammatory condition, talk to your doctor and see if it’s worth trying a nightshade-elimination diet. Otherwise, as long as you feel fine when you eat grilled eggplant or a tomato sandwich, keep enjoying these nutritious plants.

 

 

* * * * *

 

ENTRY: JUNE 30, 2024 (From Worlds Apart, But Together in My Garden)
While in the garden this morning I watched as oodles of bumblebees and other smaller pollinators were all over the now fully-in-bloom native wild senna that graces my front yard. It was then that I noticed that, by chance, I had placed a large pot of soon-to-bloom popcorn cassia right next to it. The similarities in appearance of these two very related plants from completely differently parts of the world is striking. To many, they would be hard to tell apart, minus the slightly larger leaves and the distinctly popcorn scent of the popcorn cassia.

 

Popcorn Cassia, Senna didymobotrya (syn. Cassia didymobotrya):
The plant commonly known as popcorn cassia is a legume (family Fabaceae) from tropical central and eastern Africa that is common in disturbed areas, but it is also grown as an ornamental plant world-wide. The species Senna didymobotrya has also been used as a cover crop or green manure crop in some locations. It was previously classified in the genus Cassia, and that has remained as part of its common name. The other part of the common name comes from the scent of the foliage when rubbed – often described as that of buttered popcorn, but other interpretations of the smell include the less appealing “mice” or “wet dog”. Although this tropical plant is only hardy in zones 9-11, because of its rapid growth and habit of flowering when small it is easily used as a seasonal annual in cool climates.

 

In the Midwestern garden popcorn cassia is used as an unusual accent plant with its bright yellow showy flowers contrasting with its striking black buds, for the tropical effect of its foliage, and for vertical interest with its tall flower spikes. Plant it among other annuals in the border, or as a specimen in a large container. In a mixed container it can function as the “thriller” or tall plant to contrast with other trailing or mid-sized filler plants. The large but feathery foliage contrasts nicely with other tropical with large leaves (such as bananas, elephant ears or castor bean) or anything with dark-colored leaves. Try mixing it with pink cosmos and orange dahlias for a bright burst of color, or use it with yellow dahlias and snapdragons for a sophisticated monochromatic color scheme.

 

Popcorn cassia grows best in full sun in rich, moist, well-drained soil. Provide with ample water and fertilize regularly to promote lush growth and flowering. As a tropical plant it will languish in cool weather, but will thrive in the heat and humidity of summer. Prune after flowering to keep more compact, but this will delay repeat blooming. It does not have any significant pests and is not favored by deer.
Although it will tolerate light frost, if you want to try to keep this plant over the winter in a greenhouse or a bright window, try to bring it indoors when nighttime temperatures are in the high 30’s. (Source: wimastergardener.org) The article is written by Susan Mahr.

 

Wild Senna, Senna hebecarpa (syn. Cassia hebecarpa):
Wild Senna is a versatile plant that we think deserves more recognition as a great choice for garden or restoration projects. Its lovely, bright yellow flowers bloom July-August, attracting many bees and butterflies. Autumn brings beautiful leaf colors and the formation of long black pods with seeds favored by larger birds like wild turkeys. A horizontal root system provides strength against winds, allowing the plant’s stately (4-6′) beauty to be appreciated even after the storm. Some gardeners use this sun-loving plant to form a hedge.

 

The preference is partial to full sun, and moist to mesic conditions. A rich loamy soil is preferred, although sandy and rocky soil are also tolerated. This plant can become quite tall when the soil is fertile and moist.

 

This species is occasional in some areas, and uncommon or absent in others. Populations in the wild are probably declining as a result of modern development. Habitats include moist meadows near rivers, savannas, fens, pastures, and roadsides. Some disturbance is beneficial when it reduces competition from shrubs and trees.

 

The flowers attract bumblebees primarily, which seek pollen. Halictid bees also visit the flowers for pollen, but are less likely to achieve cross-pollination. The extra-floral nectaries, on the other hand, attract primarily ants and a few other insects, including ladybird beetles and flies. It is possible that some of these insects protect the plant from other insects that would attack the foliage. The caterpillars of some Sulfur butterflies rely on the foliage of Senna spp. (Sennas) as a source of food. (Sources include: www.illinoiswildflowers.info and www.prairiemoon.com.

 

Klein’s carries both popcorn cassia (among our potted annuals) and wild senna (in our perennial area) in the springtime. Supplies of these ever-popular plants are usually depleted by the end of June.

 

KLEIN’S RECIPES OF THE MONTHThese are a selection of relatively simple recipes chosen by our staff. New recipes appear monthly. Enjoy!!

 

We are a country divided. There are eggplant lovers, and those who absolutely cannot stand it.

 

Mediterranean cultures eat lots of eggplant, and because it has a slightly meaty taste, it’s a key component of many vegetarian diets around the world. But even an eggplant lover can sympathize with anti-eggplant people. It can be wrong in so many ways. If it’s too oily (which it often is), forget about it. If it’s hidden in thick layers of mozzarella cheese and tomato sauce (eggplant parmigiana), you often can’t even find it, and when you do, it’s a slippery, greasy thing.

 

Cooking it at home is fraught with all sorts of conundrums: to salt or not to salt; to sauté or to bread it and fry; to peel or not peel. And so on.

 

The key to optimum eggplant enjoyment is simple: Buy the freshest ones you can find. That means eggplants with taut, shiny skin and ones that are firm to the touch. Look for a stem that’s still bright green. Take it home and use it quickly. Eggplant is more perishable than you might think.

 

And far more versatile. Isn’t it time you gave eggplant another chance?
(Ellise Pierce for the The Dallas Morning News @ www.dallasnews.com)

 

The following are some head-turning roasted and grilled eggplant salad recipes that may even convert the eggplant hater in your family.

 

(TRULY AMAZING!) ROASTED EGGPLANT SALAD—From Martha Stewart’s Everyday Food. This recipe is always a hit at family get-togethers!
3 medium eggplants (about 3 lbs.), peeling left on, cut into 1″ cubes
3 TBS. olive oil
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. pepper
3 TBS. white wine vinegar
2 more TBS. olive oil
1/2 tsp. additional salt
1/4 tsp additional pepper
1 pint halved cherry or grape tomatoes
1 cup snipped fresh basil

 

To roast the eggplant:
Preheat the oven to 450º. In a large bowl, toss the eggplant cubes with the 3 TBS. olive oil, 1 tsp. salt and 1/2 tsp. pepper. Spread onto two rimmed baking sheets that have been sprayed with cooking spray. Roast on two shelves in the preheated oven for 15 minutes. At 15 minutes, stir and turn the eggplant cubes and switch the sheets on the shelves to ensure even roasting. Cook 15 minutes more. Remove the sheets from the oven and allow the eggplant to cool completely on the sheets (do not stir at this time).

 

In a large bowl, whisk together the vinegar and the remaining oil, salt and pepper. Add the cooled eggplant cubes, tomatoes and basil and toss to combine. Allow to chill. Serves 6.

 

(TRULY FANTASTIC!) ROASTED EGGPLANT SALAD—An Asian twist on the above for those who love intense flavors.
3 medium eggplants (about 3 lbs.), peeling left on, cut into 1″ cubes
3 TBS. olive oil
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. pepper
1 x 10 oz. pkg. frozen peas
3 TBS. fresh lime juice
2 TBS. vegetable oil (canola)
1 tsp. curry powder
1/2 tsp. coarse salt
1/4 tsp. additional pepper
1/2 cup chopped, roasted cashews
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro

 

To roast the eggplant:
Preheat the oven to 450º. In a large bowl, toss the eggplant cubes with the 3 TBS. olive oil, 1 tsp. salt and 1/2 tsp. pepper. Spread onto two rimmed baking sheets that have been sprayed with cooking spray. Roast on two shelves in the preheated oven for 15 minutes. At 15 minutes, stir and turn the eggplant cubes and switch the sheets on the shelves to ensure even roasting. Cook 15 minutes more. Remove the sheets from the oven and allow the eggplant to cool completely on the sheets (do not stir at this time).

 

Cook the peas per instructions and rinse under cold water to chill. Set aside.

 

In a large bowl, whisk together the juice, vegetable oil, curry powder, coarse salt and pepper. Add the cooled eggplant cubes, peas, cashews and cilantro and toss to combine. Allow to chill. Serves 6.

 

(TRULY NUMMY!) ROASTED EGGPLANT SALAD—And yet one more twist on the above recipes; this one using Middle Eastern flavors.
3 medium eggplants (about 3 lbs.), peeling left on, cut into 1″ cubes
3 TBS. olive oil
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. pepper
3 TBS. fresh lemon juice
2 more TBS. olive oil
1/2 tsp. coarse salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1 x 15 oz. can garbanzos, drained and rinsed
1 cup (4 oz.) crumbled feta cheese
1/4 cup chopped fresh mint

 

To roast the eggplant:
Preheat the oven to 450º. In a large bowl, toss the eggplant cubes with the 3 TBS. olive oil, 1 tsp. salt and 1/2 tsp. pepper. Spread onto two rimmed baking sheets that have been sprayed with cooking spray. Roast on two shelves in the preheated oven for 15 minutes. At 15 minutes, stir and turn the eggplant cubes and switch the sheets on the shelves to ensure even roasting. Cook 15 minutes more. Remove the sheets from the oven and allow the eggplant to cool completely on the sheets (do not stir at this time).

 

In a large bowl, whisk together the juice and the remaining oil, salt and pepper. Add the cooled eggplant cubes, garbanzos, feta, and mint and toss to combine. Allow to chill. Serves 6.

 

GRILLED EGGPLANT SALAD—A summer favorite from the pages of Cooking Light magazine.
2 x 1 lb. eggplants cut into 1/2″ slices (peeling left on)
4 cups coarsely chopped tomato
1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese
4 TBS. snipped fresh basil
2 TBS. red wine vinegar
2 TBS. balsamic vinegar
4 tsp. capers
2 tsp. olive oil
1/2 tsp. dried oregano
1/2 tsp. pepper
1/4 tsp. salt
2 cloves minced garlic

 

Preheat the grill. Spray both sides of the eggplant slices with cooking spray and grill 5 minutes per side until tender. Allow to cool. Cut each slice into quarters. In a large bowl, combine the cooled eggplant with the rest of the ingredients and toss. Serves 6-8.

 

NATURAL NEWS–

 

A Beneficial Predator/Scavenger in the Garden: The Daddy-longleg

 

You see them almost every day, but very little is known about daddy-longlegs, also called harvestmen. They are not spiders, but belong to a group with many different species, called Opiliones. The common name, daddy-longlegs, likely came about because of their small oval body and long legs, and the name harvestman because they are most often seen in large numbers in the fall around harvest time.

 

While they have eight legs and an outward appearance of a spider, daddy-longlegs lack two of the most important features that make a spider a spider: silk production and venom. Daddy-longlegs do not have spinnerets that spiders have to produce silk and make webs. Spiders also produce venom they inject through fangs to quickly kill and digest prey. Daddy-longlegs do not produce venom, nor do they have fangs. A very popular urban legend states that the daddy-longlegs are the most poisonous spiders in the world, but their fangs are too small to penetrate human skin. This is false. Daddy-longlegs have mouthparts similar to those of crabs or scorpions that they use to hold prey while they eat. To protect themselves, daddy-longlegs produce a pungent odor most predators find distasteful.

 

Life Cycle and Habits
The body of most adult daddy-longlegs is about 1/16-1/2 inch long, oval with very long legs. Males tend to have smaller bodies than females but they have longer legs. Legs easily break off. The ability to break off legs is similar to the ability of lizards to break off a portion of their tail if being attacked by a predator. The second pair of legs are the longest and are used as a sensory structure similar to the way insects use their antennae.

 

Female daddy-longlegs lay their eggs in soil, under stones, or cracks in wood. The eggs are laid in the autumn and hatch in the spring. In the northern areas of the United States, daddy-longlegs live for only one year. In South Carolina and the rest of the southeast, daddy-longlegs can overwinter as adults and live for up to two years.

 

Daddy-longlegs are generally beneficial. They have a very broad diet that includes spiders and insects, including plant pests such as aphids. Daddy-longlegs also scavenge for dead insects and will eat bird droppings. In the fall, they can become a nuisance when they congregate in large clusters on trees and homes, usually around eves and windows. Additionally they can be found in damp crawl spaces, unfinished basements, and garages. Rarely are daddy-longlegs encountered inside finished, living spaces of homes.

 

Control
Since daddy-longlegs are beneficial predators and scavengers in nature, control should only be performed when absolutely necessary. The clustering behavior only occurs during the fall and for only a brief period of time. Daddy-longlegs do not damage structures when they cluster. If control is necessary, due to a large number of daddy-longlegs that is considered unpleasant, insecticide sprays labeled for exterior use on spiders can also be applied directly to daddy-longlegs found outdoors. However, in nearly all situations, chemical control is not necessary. Most daddy-longlegs can be removed from structures with a vacuum or broom.

 

 

JULY’S PLANT OF THE MONTH:

 

The Tomato

 

We at Klein’s know our tomatoes! With nearly 70 available varieties, we are not only the garden center to fill any tomato need, but can also help with those many tomato questions and problems that are sure to pop up. Given the fickle nature of tomato culture; growing that perfect, unblemished fruit is not always the simplest thing in the world.

 

Never plant tomatoes before mid-May. And even better, wait until late May or even early June. Tomatoes are a warm weather crop. But just as important as air temperature is the soil temperature. Soils in Madison are usually not warm enough until the end of May. Tomatoes planted too early may remain stunted and never bounce back.

 

Tomatoes require full sun and good air circulation. Tomatoes are susceptible to a number of fungal problems so good airflow is crucial. It’s also best to rotate tomatoes from season to season in the garden to help with any soil borne diseases. Many diseases can remain in the soil for years, so if historically, you’ve had a problem growing tomatoes in one spot, try them in another. Because tomatoes belong to the nightshade family (along with peppers, eggplant, potatoes, petunias, nicotiana and datura) they cannot be grown successfully near walnut trees. Walnut trees produce a toxin that prohibits the growth of many garden plants.

 

A good mulch of marsh hay, straw or fabric is also important for successful tomato culture and for two reasons. Firstly, because tomatoes are susceptible to certain fungal problems, using a mulch helps prohibit the soil borne spores from splashing up onto the leaves during rain.

 

Secondly, the use of a mulch helps keep in valuable moisture. Tomatoes are extremely thirsty plants. Inconsistent moisture levels causes a condition called blossom end rot. Most people mistake this for a fungal problem when it’s actually a nutritional problem caused by wet and dry cycles. Tomatoes prefer to be kept constantly moist, but never soggy.

 

Support or staking is also important in keeping the fruit and foliage off the ground, but with a loose bed of hay over which to sprawl, this isn’t necessary unless space is a concern.

 

Recently there has been a bit of debate about whether or not to remove the suckers (new growth where the leaves meet the stem). Traditionally, suckers are removed to direct all energy into the main stem. This will give you the largest tomatoes. But, with our short growing season, production can be severely reduced by removing the side shoots. Therefore, if your goal is large tomatoes, remove the suckers. If you prefer a heavier yield of smaller tomatoes, leave the suckers–the more branches, the more fruit.

 

AROUND TOWN:
For neighborhood events or garden tours that you would like posted in our monthly newsletter, please contact Rick at (608) 244-5661 or rick@kleinsfloral.com. Please include all details, i.e. dates, locations, prices, brief description, etc. Events must be garden related and must take place in the Madison vicinity and we must receive your information by the first of the month in which the event takes place for it to appear in that month’s newsletter.

 

Olbrich After Hours
The Summer Concert Series is back with a fresh twist and new name – Olbrich After Hours! We’re open late! Enjoy an evening in the gardens with a rolling line-up of dynamic musicians, pop-up performances, and delectable food carts. Quench your thirst with a microbrew, summer cocktail, or mocktail. And connect with eco-friendly organizations committed to conserving our environment. Bring your own lawn chair or blanket seating.

 

Concerts are FREE to the public; a $5 suggested donation is appreciated.
No tickets required. Please carry out all trash.

 

Olbrich Concerts in the Gardens 2024 Schedule:
(All concerts are on Tuesdays at 7 p.m.)

 

July 2
Driveway Thriftdwellers—Starting out as a few guys who just wanted to play some Flying Burrito Brothers tunes, the Driveway Thriftdwellers, led by brothers Jon and Ryan Knudson, have found a home in the midwest’s vibrant original Country and Americana scenes.

 

July 9
Leslie Demaso—Olbrich presents SIRENA: A multi-media project created by Leslie Damaso, Ben Ferris, Mike Koszewski and Jason Kutz, featuring Jon Irabagon, Janice Lee and Jose Guzman. SIRENA blends a personal story, family secrets, a mythic love triangle ending in the beginning of a nation, the displacement of its people, an individual’s perspective of belonging and a spectacular celebration of community. The music combines traditional Filipino kundiman songs, kulintang, along with jazz and classical influences.

 

July 16
Cycropia Aerial Dance, with Searchlights and Ho Etsu Taiko—The booming sounds of Chicago’s Ho Etsu Taiko’s drums will ring through Olbrich Botanical Gardens, extending cinematic soundscapes from the central Wisconsin band Searchlights, all connecting with Madison’s own Cycropia Aerial Dance taking flight and literally dancing in the sky. This collaboration is a celebration of bridging the earth and heavens, translating inspiration from nature to make visual and audible art. What better place for this collaboration than Olbrich where the gardens are an expression of humans channeling heavenly energy through the sun and the natural elements of plants to surround the audience in art.

 

July 23
The Earthlings—The Earthlings have spent the last decade fostering a community and reputation in Madison of one of the town’s most exciting live shows. The music is cinematic and groovy.

 

July 30
Ben Mulwana and The Village—Ben Mulwana is a Ugandan-born and raised artist residing in Kenosha, Wisconsin. With thought-provoking lyrics and a diverse range of musical inspiration, Mulwana’s music has been described as afro-soul rock that takes on a unique storytelling quality. The single features a full band composition, bringing a dynamic and high energy quality that builds on the soulful presence of his performances.

 

August 6
Mokoomba—Mokoomba is an explosively talented six-man crew from Mosi-oa-Tunya (Victoria Falls), Zimbabwe. Hailed as one of the most exciting bands from Africa in the 21st century, they are setting dance floors ablaze with their unique mix of traditional Tonga and pan-African music cultures with dashes of Rap, Ska, Soukous, and Afro-Cuban music. With over 40 countries and prestigious international festivals under their belt, they have performed at the world’s biggest venues!

 

August 13
Opera at Olbrich—Fresco Opera is back! Stroll through the Gardens and take in roaming performances of several operatic scenes performed in a variety of garden areas. A magical experience for all your senses.

 

Olbrich Botanical Gardens
3330 Atwood Ave., Madison
608/246-4550 or www.olbrich.org for details.

 

Nature Hike @ the Arboretum
Sunday, July 7, 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

 

Learn about the land, plants, animals, fungi, phenology, and ecology. Geared for adults, these longer walks may cover some sloping terrain. Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes. Walks canceled for unsafe weather or trail conditions. Free, no registration required. Meet at the Visitor Center.

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

Family Nature Walk @ the Arboretum
Sunday, July 7, 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

 

This walk is a fun, fascinating way for families with children elementary age and younger to explore the natural world. Adults must attend. Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes and come prepared for weather and insects. Walks canceled for unsafe weather or trail conditions. Free, no registration required. Meet at the Visitor Center.

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

Summer Sundays: Jazz in the Garden at Allen Centennial Garden
Add a little bit of musical enjoyment to your Sunday afternoons this summer with Summer Sundays: Concerts in the Garden. The concerts will be held alternating Sunday afternoons starting June 9 and ending August 18, from 5-6:15 p.m.

 

This event is free and open to the public. Brought to you by the Friends of Allen Centennial Garden.

 

July 7
Panchromatic Caribbean Jazz
Madison’s fusion steel band, focuses on artful, improvised music representing styles original to the southern Caribbean. Fusing island styles with pop hits, rock and jazz, PCJ offers a high-energy blend that is hard to categorize but easy to love.

 

July 21
Gerri Dimaggio
DiMaggio’s sultry mix of Brazilian melodies and jazz standards is as original as it is enticing. Her emotional engagement honors the traditions of Jazz and Latin rhythms. Gerri and her band are celebrating the recent release of their new recording Caravan.

 

August 4
Ray Rideout Jazz Quartet
Everything from post-bop, to old standards and Tin Pan Alley, RRJQ is a burst of energy chanelleing Wayne Shorter, Cedar Walton, John Coltrane, along with music of Cole Porter and Rodgers and Hammerstein. Modern jazz professionalism personified.

 

August 18
The Jazz Guys Quintet
The Jazz Guys return with tight new renditions of modern jazz and standards and stylish jazz arrangements of classic pop in carefully honed original arrangements first developed during the pandemic quarantine and debuted at Café Coda in spring 2021.

 

Allen Centennial Gardens
620 Babcock Dr. on the University of WI campus, Madison
608/576-2501 or allencentennialgarden.org for details.

 

Dragonfly Monitoring Walk @ the Arboretum
Wednesday, July 10, 3:00-4:30 p.m.
Family Walk

 

Join the Arboretum and the Wisconsin Dragonfly Society for guided walks to monitor dragonflies. Help identify species and collect data for the Arboretum’s dragonfly monitoring project. No experience required, but an online training video is available by request (email citizenscience@arboretum.wisc.edu). Recommended for ages 12 and up. Walks take place several times a month through early October but may be canceled for rainy or cool weather. Meet at the Visitor Center.

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

Summer Container Walk @ Olbrich Gardens
Wednesday, July 10, 5:00-6:30 p.m.

 

Discover the endless possibilities of designing garden containers to enhance your landscape! Containers can thrive all season long by learning tricks and tips of designing, planting, pruning, and general maintenance. Design techniques for sun and shade containers, hanging baskets, succulent combinations, herbs, tropicals, and more will be shared. Gardeners of any experience level will enjoy this walk.

 

Instructor: Samara Eisner, Olbrich Botanical Gardens

 

Cost: $22 or $18 for Olbrich Members

 

 

Olbrich Botanical Gardens
3330 Atwood Ave., Madison
608/246-4550 or www.olbrich.org for details.

 

Plants for Pollinators @ the Arboretum
Wednesday, July 10, 7:00-8:30 p.m.
Garden Tour

 

Learn more about summer-blooming native and ornamental species in Arboretum gardens. Susan Carpenter, Native Plant Garden curator, will highlight plants and gardening practices that support essential pollinators in urban/suburban landscapes. Tour may be canceled for unsafe weather. Free, no registration required. Meet at the Visitor Center.

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

Olbrich’s Home Garden Tour
Featuring Six Garden Sanctuaries in Shorewood Hills
Friday, July 12 and Saturday, July 13, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

 

Olbrich’s 2024 Home Garden Tour features Seven Gardens in Sun Prairie

 

Just a hop, skip, and jump north of Madison, Olbrich Botanical Gardens presents seven unique gardens in Sun Prairie. Working with nature, the gardeners incorporate native trees and shrubs to establish the backbone of the garden, while pops of colorful pollinator plants support a variety of beneficial insects and songbirds. Navigate the tour route with ease and learn more about featured native plants, by using the Home Garden Tour app, accessible by QR code on the tour ticket.

 

Tickets are $15 for Olbrich members and $17 for the general public, $7 for children ages 6-12 and free for children 5 and under.

 

Advance tickets available for purchase at Olbrich’s lobby thru July 11.

 

Tour day ticket sales July 12 & 13, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., 5236 Preservation Place, Sun Prairie, WI 53590 (featured garden). This is a private residence, tickets are only available during tour hours.

 

*Garden site addresses are listed on the tour tickets, which can be purchased at Olbrich Gardens prior to the tour. The garden site addresses are only published on the tour tickets to protect the homeowners’ privacy.

 

Olbrich Botanical Gardens
3330 Atwood Ave., Madison
608/246-4550 or www.olbrich.org for details.

 

Nature Hike @ the Arboretum
Sunday, July 14, 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

 

Learn about the land, plants, animals, fungi, phenology, and ecology. Geared for adults, these longer walks may cover some sloping terrain. Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes. Walks canceled for unsafe weather or trail conditions. Free, no registration required. Meet at the Visitor Center.

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

Learning Together: Forest Friends @ the Arboretum
Tuesday, July 16, 10:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
Family Class

 

We will share stories and create nature art and crafts. This class is for preschool-age children and their adult caregivers. Adults must attend. Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes and come seasonally prepared for weather and insects. Fee: $20 per family/group of up to four people. Register by July 8 @ https://arboretum.wisc.edu/group-classes/learning-together-family-class-brilliant-bugs/ . Meet at the Visitor Center.

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

Rotary Garden’s What’s in Bloom? Tour
Wednesday, July 17, 10:00-11:00 a.m.
Rotary Botanical Gardens, 1455 Palmer Dr., Janesville, WI

 

Rotary Botanical Gardens Director of Horticulture, Michael Jesiolowski will provide a behind-the-scenes look at what’s blooming this month and answer any questions you may have.

 

What’s in Bloom? Tours take place on select Wednesdays of each month (April-September). The tours are free for RBG members, or $10 for non-members.

 

To register, please call 608.752.3885.

 

Rotary Botanical Gardens
1455 Palmer Dr., Janesville, WI

 

Olbrich Garden’s Blooming Butterflies Exhibit
July 17-August 11
Daily from 10:00-4:00
In the Bolz Conservatory

 

THE BUTTERFLIES ARE BACK!
Blooming Butterflies features up to 19 different species of free flying butterflies in the tropical Bolz Conservatory. Visitors make connections with these fluttering friends while learning about the butterfly life cycle. Two chrysalis cases provide opportunities to possibly witness a butterfly emerge from a chrysalis!

 

During Blooming Butterflies, the outdoor gardens spotlight relationships between plants and pollinators with an ‘I SPY’ Pollinators scavenger hunt. A pollinator themed children’s book is displayed as a StoryWalk along Starkweather Creek. And every child that attends Blooming Butterflies receives a coupon for a free junior scoop from our friends at Chocolate Shoppe Ice Cream!
You can prepare for your visit by watching the Blooming Butterfies Welcome Video.

 

The life span of different butterflies varies from a few weeks to a few months. All flying butterflies live out their natural lives in the Conservatory, with food sources remaining for them after the exhibit dates.

 

Butterfly Action Day
Friday, August 2
10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Join us for a special day with representatives from local organizations invested in butterfly conservation! Display booths and kid-friendly activities in the Learning Center will highlight what you can do to support butterflies. No cost to attend or participate, but there is a separate cost to enter Blooming Butterflies.

 

The cost is $8 for adults, $5 for children ages 6-12, and free for children 5 and under. Olbrich Botanical Society members are admitted free. Parking is free. Bus tours are welcome; groups of 10 or more must register by calling 608/245-3648.

 

Olbrich Botanical Gardens
3330 Atwood Ave., Madison
608/246-4550 or www.olbrich.org for details.

 

Full Moon Night Walk @ the Arboretum
Saturday, July 20, 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm

 

Let your eyes adjust to the moonlight, listen to the night sounds, and experience the darkness on this naturalist-led walk (full moon July 21). Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes and come prepared for weather and insects. Walks canceled for unsafe weather or trail conditions. Free, register through Eventbrite by July 16: uw-madison-arboretum.eventbrite.com . Meet at the Visitor Center.

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

Nature Hike in the Grady Tract @ the Arboretum
Sunday, July 21, 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Walk

 

Learn about the land, plants, animals, fungi, phenology, and ecology. Geared for adults, these longer walks may cover sloping terrain. Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes and come prepared for weather and insects. Walks canceled for unsafe weather or trail conditions. Free, no registration required. Meet at Grady Tract parking lot, southeast corner of Seminole Hwy. and W. Beltline Frontage Rd. (No restroom facilities at Grady Tract.)

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

Family Nature Program: All Aflutter for Butterflies @ the Arboretum
Sunday, July 21, 1:30 pm – 3:30 pm

 

This program is a fun, fascinating way for families with children elementary age and younger to explore the natural world. Nature walk: 1:30–2:30 p.m., activities: 2:30–3:30 p.m. Adults must attend. Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes and come prepared for weather. Walks canceled for unsafe weather or trail conditions. Free, no registration required. Meet at the Visitor Center.

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

Notable Natives Walk @ Olbrich Gardens
Thursday, July 25, 6:00-7:30 p.m.

 

This summery stroll with Olbrich horticulturist Erin Presley highlights an array of garden-worthy Midwestern native perennials, trees and shrubs. We will check out native plants suitable for gardens of all sizes and a range of growing conditions. We will touch on design and maintenance tips for incorporating native plants, good sources for purchasing natives, benefits to wildlife, and considerations when including native plant cultivars. Prepare to be inspired by these notable natives!

 

Instructor: Erin Presley, Olbrich Botanical Gardens

 

Cost: $22 or $18 for Olbrich Members

 

 

Olbrich Botanical Gardens
3330 Atwood Ave., Madison
608/246-4550 or www.olbrich.org for details.

 

Dragonfly Monitoring Walk @ the Arboretum
Saturday, July 27, 10:00-11:30 p.m.
Family Walk

 

Join the Arboretum and the Wisconsin Dragonfly Society for guided walks to monitor dragonflies. Help identify species and collect data for the Arboretum’s dragonfly monitoring project. No experience required, but an online training video is available by request (email citizenscience@arboretum.wisc.edu). Recommended for ages 12 and up. Walks take place several times a month through early October but may be canceled for rainy or cool weather. Meet at the Visitor Center.

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

Scenic Stroll @ the Arboretum
Sunday, July 28, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

 

This gently paced stroll through the gardens is well-suited for a multi-generational outing. Learn about plants, animals, and fungi; phenology; and ecology. Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes and come prepared for weather and insects. Walks take place rain or shine, except in unsafe weather. Routes are wheelchair accessible when weather allows. Free, no registration required. Meet at the Visitor Center.

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

Evening Meadow Stroll @ Olbrich Gardens
Wednesday, July 31, 5:00-6:00 p.m.

 

In the golden afternoon hours of summer smell the sweet scent of garden phlox, and observe how different grasses sway in the wind on this gorgeous stroll through Olbrich’s meadows. Enjoy the gardens in their full summer glory. We will discuss each meadow’s creation, maintenance, and contributions to Olbrich’s vast ecosystem. Gardeners of all skill levels will enjoy this gorgeous garden stroll!

 

Instructor: Avery Pronschinske, Olbrich Botanical Gardens

 

Cost: $22 or $18 for Olbrich Members

 

 

Olbrich Botanical Gardens
3330 Atwood Ave., Madison
608/246-4550 or www.olbrich.org for details.

 

Dane County Farmer’s Market
Saturdays, April 13 thru November 9, 6:15-1:45
On the Capitol Square

 

Wednesdays, April 24 thru November 6, 8:30-1:45
In the 200 block of Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.

 

For details visit www.dcfm.org

 

Northside Farmers Market
Sundays, May 5 through October 20, 8:30-12:30
In the Northside TownCenter at the intersection of N. Sherman Ave. and Northport Dr. across from Warner Park.

 

The Northside Farmers Market is a nonprofit community enterprise. It is one of the newest and fastest growing farmers’ markets in Dane County. In keeping with the innovative spirit of Madison’s Northside, we are surpassing what defines the traditional farmers’ market. Our fundamental principles include:

 

–Providing an abundant selection of high quality, locally grown foods.
The market accepts Quest, WIC and Senior FMNP vouchers.

 

–Supporting our local agricultural entrepreneurs who are increasingly important today in ensuring that we have the best and safest food possible.

 

–Educating the community about traditional foods and the history of local agriculture in an attempt to preserve (and expand upon) our rich heritage.

 

Parking is always FREE!

 

 

JULY IN THE GARDEN-A checklist of things to do this month.
___Pinch hardy mums until July 4 for bushier less floppy plants.
___Begin sowing and transplanting cole crops for fall harvest.
___Fertilize and mulch asparagus beds.
___Give the garden at least 1″ of moisture per week.
___Mow as little as possible and with mower raised to at least 2″.
___Mulch beds to conserve moisture and keep down weeds.
___Deadhead spent blooms as needed.
___Stake and support tall plants as needed.
___Cut spent perennials to the ground to encourage new growth.
___Divide daylilies as they finish blooming.
___Fertilize potted plants at least every 2 weeks. Follow directions.
___Order spring bulbs from catalogs while your memory is still fresh.
___Keep and eye on the weather. Water as needed.
___Watch for pests and control as needed or desired.
___Stop fertilizing roses by late July.
___Visit Klein’s—Watch for end of season savings on annuals, perennials & shrubs.

 

Some of our very favorite seed and plant sources include:

 

For seeds:
Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds @ www.rareseeds.com or 417/924-8887
Burpee @ www.burpee.com or 800/888-1447
Harris Seeds @ www.harrisseeds.com or 800/514-4441
Johnny’s Select Seeds @ www.johnnyseeds.com or 207/861-3901
Jung’s Seeds @ www.jungseed.com or 800/247-5864
Park’s Seeds @ www.parkseed.com or 800/845-3369
Pinetree @ www.superseeds.com or 207/926-3400
Seeds of Change @ www.seedsofchange.com or 888/762-7333
Seed Savers @ www.seedsavers.org or 563/382-5990
Select Seeds @ www.selectseeds.com or 800/684-0395
Territorial Seeds @ www.territorialseed.com or 888/657-3131

 

For bulbs:
Brent & Becky’s Bulbs @ www.brentandbeckysbulbs.com or 877/661-2852
Colorblends @ www.colorblends.com or 888/847-8637
John Scheeper’s @ www.johnscheepers.com or 860/567-0838
McClure & Zimmerman @ www.mzbulb.com or 800/883-6998

 

For plants:
High Country Gardens @ www.highcountrygardens.com or 800/925-9387
Logee’s Greenhouses @ www.logees.com or 888/330-8038
Plant Delights Nursery @ www.plantdelights.com or 912/772-4794
Roots and Rhizomes @ www.rootsrhizomes.com or 800/374-5035
Wayside Gardens @ www.waysidegardens.com or 800/213-0379
White Flower Farm @ www.whiteflowerfarm.com or 800/503-9624

 

BEHIND THE SCENES AT KLEIN’SThis is a sneak peek of what is going on each month behind the scenes in our greenhouses. Many people are unaware that our facility operates year round or that we have 10 more greenhouses on the property in addition to the 6 open for retail. At any given moment we already have a jump on the upcoming season–be it poinsettias in July, geraniums in December or fall mums in May.

 

IN JULY:
—Watering is a nonstop endeavor. On hot, windy days, we no sooner finish the first round, when we have to start all over again. Some plants in our retail areas may need watering 3 or 4 times in a single day! You wouldn’t do this at home, but customers don’t like to see wilted plants. It’s not harmful for us to let them wilt a bit, but it makes for bad presentation.

 

—Yes, the poinsettias arrive. The small plants are potted and placed in a warm greenhouse out back where they are constantly misted for a few days until they begin rooting out. After a few weeks they are individually pinched for sturdy and bushy growth.

 

—Summer maintenance projects are under way.

 

—We transplant our fall cole crops into cell packs along with our fall pansies and violas.

 

PERMANENT FEATURES–
KLEIN’S MONTHLY NEWSLETTER
Have our monthly newsletter e-mailed to you automatically by signing up on the top of our home page @ kleinsfloral.com . We’ll offer monthly tips, greenhouse news and tidbits, specials and recipes. . .everything you need to know from your favorite Madison greenhouse. And tell your friends. It’s easy to do.

 

THE MAD GARDENER–“Madison’s Firsthand Source for Expert Gardening Advice”
Ask us your gardening questions by e-mailing us at madgardener@kleinsfloral.com. Klein’s in-house Mad Gardener will e-mail you with an answer as promptly as we can. The link is posted on our home page and in all newsletters.

 

We can only answer those questions pertaining to gardening in Southern Wisconsin and we reserve the right to leave correspondence unanswered at our discretion. Please allow 2-3 days for a response.

 

KLEIN’S ‘HOUSEPLANT HELP’
You can contact Klein’s in-house indoor plant experts by emailing to houseplanthelp@kleinsfloral.com for sound information and advice regarding indoor tropicals, succulents, blooming plants and so much more.

 

For many years, customers’ indoor plant questions have been directed to Klein’s Mad Gardener. Now you have the opportunity to contact our indoor plant experts directly. We’ve posted a link on our home page and in our contacts for your convenience. Your question might then appear in the “You Asked” feature of our monthly newsletter. If your question is the one selected for our monthly newsletter, you’ll receive a small gift from us at Klein’s.

 

We reserve the right to leave correspondence unanswered at our discretion. Please allow 2-3 days for a response.

 

TO WRITE A REVIEW OF KLEIN’S, PLEASE LINK TO

 

FACEBOOK
Follow Klein’s on Facebook where we post updates and photos on a regular basis.

 

TWITTER
Join Klein’s on Twitter where we post company updates and photos on a regular basis.

 

SENIOR CITIZEN DISCOUNT
We offer a 5% Off Senior Citizen Discount every Tuesday to those 62 and above. This discount is not in addition to other discounts or sales. Please mention that you are a senior before we ring up your purchases. Does not apply to wire out orders or services, i.e. delivery, potting, etc.

 

DELIVERY INFO

Klein’s Floral and Greenhouses delivers daily, except Sundays, throughout all of Madison and much of Dane County including: Cottage Grove, Deerfield, DeForest, Fitchburg, Maple Bluff, Marshall, McFarland, Middleton, Monona, Oregon, Shorewood Hills, Sun Prairie, Verona, Waunakee and Windsor. We do not deliver to Cambridge, Columbus or Stoughton.

Current delivery rate on 1-4 items is $9.95 for Madison, Maple Bluff, Monona and Shorewood Hills; $10.95 for Cottage Grove, DeForest, Fitchburg, McFarland, Sun Prairie, Waunakee and Windsor; and $11.95 for Marshall, Middleton, Oregon and Verona. An additional $3.00 will be added for deliveries of 4-10 items and $5.00 added for deliveries of more than 10 items. For deliveries requiring more than one trip, a separate delivery charge will be added for each trip.

 

A minimum order of $25.00 is required for delivery.

We not only deliver our fabulous fresh flowers, but also houseplants, bedding plants and hardgoods. There may be an extra charge for very large or bulky items.

Delivery to the Madison hospitals is $5.95. Deliveries to the four Madison hospitals are made during the early afternoon. Items are delivered to the hospital’s volunteer rooms and not directly to the patients’ rooms per hospital rules.

There is no delivery charge for funerals in the city of Madison or Monona, although normal rates apply for morning funeral deliveries to Madison’s west side (west of Park St.). Our normal rates also apply for funeral deliveries in the surrounding communities at all times. Although we don’t deliver on Sundays, we will deliver funeral items on Sundays at the regular delivery rate.

 

Morning delivery is guaranteed to the following Madison zip codes, but only if requested: 53703, 53704, 53714, 53716, 53718 and Cottage Grove, Deerfield, DeForest, Maple Bluff, Marshall, McFarland, Monona, Sun Prairie, Waunakee and Windsor.

We begin our delivery day at 8:00 a.m. and end at approximately 3:00 p.m. We do not usually deliver after 4:00 unless specific exceptions are made with our drivers.

Except for holidays, the following west-side zip codes and communities are delivered only during the afternoon: 53705, 53706, 53711, 53713, 53717, 53719, 53726, Fitchburg, Middleton, Oregon, Shorewood Hills and Verona.

During holidays (Christmas, Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day, etc.) we are able to make morning deliveries to all of the above areas. We are not able to take closely timed deliveries on any holiday due to the sheer volume of such requests.

It’s best to give us a range of time and we’ll try our absolute hardest. Orders for same day delivery must be placed by 12:30 p.m. or by 2:30 p.m. for Madison zip codes 53704 and 53714.

 

DEPARTMENT HEADS: Please refer all questions, concerns or feedback in the following departments to their appropriate supervisor. Phone: 608/244-5661.

 

Horticulturalist & General Manager–Jamie VandenWymelenberg jamie@kleinsfloral.com
Floral Manager—Sarah Somson floral@kleinsfloral.com
Houseplant Buyer, Newsletter Coordinator—Rick Halbach rick@kleinsfloral.com
Purchasing—Megan Johnson megan@kleinsfloral.com
Owner, Floral Designer & Purchasing—Sue Klein sue@kleinsfloral.com

 

RELATED RESOURCES AND WEB SITES
University of Wisconsin Extension
1 Fen Oak Ct. #138
Madison, WI 53718
608/224-3700

 

Plant Disease Diagnostics Clinic
Dept. of Plant Pathology
1630 Linden Dr.
Madison, WI 53706

 

Insect Diagnostic Lab
240 Russell Labs
1630 Linden Dr.
Madison, WI 53706

 

U.W. Soil and Plant Analysis Lab
8452 Mineral Point Rd.
Verona, WI 53593
608/262-4364

 

American Horticultural Society

 

Garden Catalogs (an extensive list with links)

 

Invasive Species

 

Community Groundworks
3601 Memorial Dr., Ste. 4
Madison, WI 53704
608/240-0409

 

Madison Area Master Gardeners (MAMGA)

 

Wisconsin Master Gardeners Program
Department of Horticulture
1575 Linden Drive
University of Wisconsin – Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608/265-4504

 

The Wisconsin Gardener

 

Allen Centennial Gardens
620 Babcock Dr.
Madison, WI 53706
608/262-8406

 

Olbrich Botanical Gardens
3330 Atwood Ave.
Madison, WI 53704
608/246-4550

 

Rotary Gardens
1455 Palmer Dr.
Janesville, WI 53545
608/752-3885

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888

 

University of Wisconsin-West Madison
Agricultural Research Center
8502 Mineral Point Rd.
Verona, WI 53593
608/262-2257

 

PLANTS POISONOUS TO CHILDREN:
Children may find the bright colors and different textures of plants irresistible, but some plants can be poisonous if touched or eaten. If you’re in doubt about whether or not a plant is poisonous, don’t keep it in your home. The risk is not worth it. The following list is not comprehensive, so be sure to seek out safety information on the plants in your home to be safe.
•Bird of paradise
•Bull nettle
•Castor bean
•Chinaberry tree
•Crocus
•Daffodil
•Deadly nightshade
•Dieffenbachia (dumb cane)
•Foxglove
•Glory lily
•Hemlock
•Holly berry
•Indian tobacco
•Iris
•Jimsonweed
•Lantana
•Larkspur
•Lily of the valley
•Marijuana
•Mescal bean
•Mexicantes
•Mistletoe
•Morning glory
•Mountain laurel
•Night-blooming jasmine
•Nutmeg
•Oleander
•Philodendron
•Poison ivy
•Poison sumac
•Pokeweed
•Poppy
•Potato
•Privet
•Rhododendron
•Rhubarb
•Water hemlock
•Wisteria

 

PLANTS POISONOUS TO PETS:
Below is a list of some of the common plants which may produce a toxic reaction in animals. This list is intended only as a guide to plants which are generally identified as having the capability for producing a toxic reaction. Source: The National Humane Society website @ http://www.humanesociety.org/
•Aconite
•Apple
•Arrowgrasses
•Autumn Crocus
•Azaleas
•Baneberry
•Bird-of-Paradise
•Black locust
•Bloodroot
•Box
•Buckeye
•Buttercup
•Caladium
•Carolina jessamine
•Castor bean
•Chinaberry tree
•Chockcherries
•Christmas berry
•Christmas Rose
•Common privet
•Corn cockle
•Cowbane
•Cow cockle
•Cowsliprb
•Daffodil
•Daphne
•Day lily
•Delphinium (Larkspur)
•Dumbcane
•Dutchman’s breeches
•Easter lily
•Elderberry
•Elephant’s ear
•English Ivy
•European Bittersweet
•Field peppergrass
•Foxglove
•Holly
•Horsechestnut
•Horse nettle
•Hyacinth
•Iris
•Jack-in-the-pulpit
•Jerusalem Cherry
•Jimsonweed
•Lantana
•Larkspur
•Laurels
•Lily of the valley
•Lupines
•Mayapple
•Milk vetch
•Mistletoe
•Monkshood
•Morning glory
•Mustards
•Narcissus
•Nicotiana
•Nightshade
•Oaks
•Oleander
•Philodendrons
•Pokeweed
•Poinsettia
•Poison hemlock
•Potato
•Rhododendron
•Rhubarb
•Rosary pea
•Sago palm
•Skunk cabbage
•Smartweeds
•Snow-on-the-mountain
•Sorghum
•Star of Bethlehem
•Wild black cherry
•Wild radish
•Wisteria
•Yellow jessamine
•Yew