‘THE SAGE’-Klein’s Online Newsletter—SEPTEMBER 2019
Klein’s Floral & Greenhouses
608/244-5661 or [email protected]

 

THIS MONTH’S HIGHLIGHTS:
Check Out Our Current End-of-Season Specials
Arriving Soon . . . The Spring Bulbs!!
Our ‘Mad Gardener’ Is Ready for Your Questions
Klein’s Delivery Service: Everything You Need To Know
A History of Grandparents’ Day
Klein’s Favorite Seed, Bulb & Plant Sources
Lily Leaf Beetle Spreading in Wisconsin
You Asked the Mad Gardener About a Browning Indoor Palm
Plant of the Month: Mangave
Klein’s Favorite Edamame Recipes
Product Spotlight: Systemic Insect Control from Bonide
Notes from Rick’s Garden Journal—From August 2019
—About Sandhill Cranes
—Gardening Success: Art vs. Science
—Growing Cotton Is Fun and Educational
September in the Garden: A Planner
Gardening Events Around Town
Review Klein’s @: Yelp, Google Reviews or Facebook Reviews
Join Us on Twitter
Follow Us on Facebook

 

THE MAD GARDENER
“Madison’s Firsthand Source for Expert Gardening Advice”

 

Ask any of your gardening questions by e-mailing them to us at [email protected]. Klein’s in-house Mad Gardener will e-mail you with an answer as promptly as we can. We’ve also posted a link to this e-mail address on our home page for your convenience. Your question might then appear in the “You Asked” feature of our monthly newsletter. If your question is the one selected for our monthly newsletter, you’ll receive a small gift from us at Klein’s. The Mad Gardener hopes to hear from you soon!

 

Sorry, we can only answer those questions pertaining to gardening in Southern Wisconsin and we reserve the right to leave correspondence unanswered at our discretion. Please allow 2-3 days for a response.

 

Please note that our Mad Gardener is not only an expert gardener, but can answer all of your indoor plant questions as well.

 

ENJOY THESE END OF SEASON SAVINGS:
50% OFF All Remaining Perennials, Shrubs, Hardy Vines, Pond Plants, Potted Fruits and Large Tropicals. (Note: Perennial sale does not include fall mums.)

 

Buy One, Get One Free on All Remaining Summer Annuals in 6” Pots & Smaller.

 

(Sales do not apply to fall annuals, fall vegetables, mums, mixed fall containers or houseplants.)

 

FOR NEIGHBORHOOD EVENTS OR GARDEN TOURS that you would like posted on our web site or in our monthly newsletters, please contact Rick at (608) 244-5661 or [email protected]. Please include all details, i.e. dates, locations, prices, brief description, etc. Events must be garden related and must take place in the Madison area.

 

SEPTEMBER STORE HOURS:
Monday thru Friday : 8:00-6:00
Saturday: 9:00-5:00
Sunday: 10:00-4:00

 

Open Labor Day, Monday, September 2: 10:00-4:00

 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:
Week of September 1The Spring Bulbs Arrive!! Tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, crocus, alliums and much more arrive for fall planting. We suggest that you hold off planting spring bulbs until the weather cools in October. But shop early for best selection!

 

September 2–Labor Day. Special Store Hours: 10:00-4:00

 

September 8–Grandparents’ Day

 

September 13–Full Moon

 

September 23–Fall Begins

 

September 29—Rosh Hashana

 

‘THE FLOWER SHOPPE’:

 

A History of Grandparents’ Day (Sunday, Sept. 8, 2019)

 

Purpose:
This day has a threefold purpose:
—To honor grandparents
—To give grandparents an opportunity to show love for their children’s children.
—To help children become aware of the strength, information and guidance older people can offer.

 

Grandparents Day First Sunday After Labor Day
In 1970, a West Virginia housewife, Marian Lucille Herndon McQuade, initiated a campaign to set aside a special day just for Grandparents. Through concerted efforts on the part of civic, business, church, and political leaders, this campaign expanded statewide. Senator Jennings Randolph (D-WV) was especially instrumental in the project. The first Grandparents Day was proclaimed in 1973 in West Virginia by Governor Arch Moore. Also in 1973, Senator Randolph introduced a Grandparents Day resolution in the United States Senate. The resolution languished in committee.

 

Mrs. McQuade and her team turned to the media to garner support. They also began contacting governors, senators, congressmen in every state. And they sent letters to churches, businesses, and numerous national organizations interested in senior citizens. In 1978, five years after its West Virginia inception, the United States Congress passed legislation proclaiming the first Sunday after Labor Day as National Grandparents Day. The proclamation was signed by President Jimmy Carter. (September was chosen for the holiday, to signify the “autumn years” of life.)
Today this event, begun by only a few, is observed by millions throughout the United States.

 

Observance/Suggested Activities
Grandparents Day is a family day. Schools, churches, and senior organizations honor grandparents with special events. Some families enjoy small, private gatherings. Others celebrate by holding a family reunion. Board games which are easily played by young and old add enjoyment to family gatherings, enhancing “intergenerational interaction”.

 

For those who entertain large groups, it can be fun to have a story-telling time, allowing grandparents to relate stories of their past, enlightening children about ” the old days.” Also interesting is to take a census, such as oldest and newest grandchild, family with the most grandchildren, and families with five generation present.

 

As Grandparents Day approaches, help Children and/or Grandchildren to identify and date all photos in old family albums. Many happy memories can be derived from this.Everyone is a grandchild and can be involved in the observance of this day – a time to discover one’s roots and learn patience, understanding and appreciation for the elderly. Grandparents Day is the perfect time to enhance communication between the generations.

 

Special talents, such as cooking, sculpting or quilting can be passed on to those who display an interest. Old family music, songs and dances, along with their meanings and origins, are important in maintaining a strong sense of family background. Together, re-construct a family tree, giving children the opportunity to learn the ancestral line of their family. Strive to preserve particular ethnic or religious beliefs.

 

Many times, only grandparents have answers to questions about family histories. When this information is passed down to the grandchildren, everyone can be assured of his heritage being preserved.

 

Most important, Grandparents Day can signify a loving spirit that lives within us throughout the year–a spirit of love and respect for our elders.

 

YOU ASKED THE MAD GARDENER . . .
I purchased a majesty palm from Klein’s and this past month it has been starting to become very unhealthy. I keep the palm in our apartment and have followed the care instructions I received upon purchase. I water it once a week, keep it in medium indirect light and allow the soil to dry out between waterings. Many of the fronds have turned brown and fallen off and more fronds are getting brown tips each day. Please let me know your recommendations. Claire

 

Hi Claire,
My best guess (and based on years of experience with this same issue regarding tropical palms), is that you use an air conditioner during the summer months. I had this question just yesterday afternoon from another customer and with almost identical pictures to those you emailed me. Air conditioning is a tropical palm’s worst enemy in that they prefer high humidity to thrive. Air conditioners can bring air humidity to as low as 40%. The more an air conditioner is used, the worse the browning. The plant isn’t dying and usually rebounds, but it can be really unattractive in the interim.

 

Remove any browning fronds and trim browning tips with a scissors. When watering, make sure to water deeply. Palms prefer soil leaning toward moist, rather than dry; never allowing them to dry out completely between waterings.

 

Occasional misting, a humidifier (in non-air conditioner months) or placing it in a tray of water on top of pebbles will help the situation.

 

Thanks for your question,
Klein’s Mad Gardener

 

DID YOU KNOW. . .
. . . that Klein’s delivers to all of Madison and most of Dane County?

 

Klein’s Floral and Greenhouses delivers daily, except Sundays, throughout all of Madison and most of Dane County including: Cottage Grove, Dane, DeForest, Fitchburg, Maple Bluff, Marshall, McFarland, Middleton, Monona, Oregon, Shorewood Hills, Sun Prairie, Verona, Waunakee and Windsor. We do not deliver to Cambridge, Columbus, Deerfield or Stoughton.

 

Current delivery rate on 1-4 items is $7.95 for Madison, Maple Bluff, Monona and Shorewood Hills; $8.95 for Cottage Grove, DeForest, Fitchburg, McFarland, Sun Prairie, Waunakee and Windsor; and $9.95 for Marshall, Middleton, Oregon and Verona. An additional $3.00 will be added for deliveries of 4-10 items and $5.00 added for deliveries of more than 10 items. For deliveries requiring more than one trip, a separate delivery charge will be added for each trip.

 

A minimum order of $25.00 is required for delivery.

 

We not only deliver our fabulous fresh flowers, but also houseplants, bedding plants and hardgoods. There may be an extra charge for very large or bulky items.
Delivery to the Madison hospitals is $5.95. Deliveries to the four downtown Madison hospitals are made during the early afternoon. We deliver to east-side University Hospital both mornings and afternoons . Items are delivered to the hospital’s volunteer rooms or information desks and not directly to the patients’ rooms per hospital rules.

 

There is no delivery charge for funerals in the city of Madison or Monona, although normal rates apply for morning funeral deliveries to Madison’s west side (west of Park St.). Our normal rates also apply for funeral deliveries in the surrounding communities at all times. Although we don’t deliver on Sundays, we will deliver funeral items on Sundays at the regular delivery rate.

 

Morning delivery is guaranteed to the following Madison zip codes, but only if requested: 53703, 53704, 53714, 53716, 53718 and Cottage Grove, DeForest, Maple Bluff, Marshall, McFarland, Monona, Sun Prairie, Waunakee and Windsor.

 

We begin our delivery day at 8:00 a.m. and end at approximately 3:00 p.m. We do not usually deliver after 4:00 unless specific exceptions are made with our drivers.
Except for holidays, the following west-side zip codes and communities are delivered only during the afternoon: 53705, 53706, 53711, 53713, 53717, 53719, 53726, Fitchburg, Middleton, Oregon, Shorewood Hills and Verona, unless specific exceptions are made with our drivers.

 

During holidays (Christmas, Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day, etc.) we are able to make morning deliveries to all of the above areas. We are not able to take closely timed deliveries on any holiday due to the sheer volume of such requests.

 

It’s best to give us a range of time and we’ll try our absolute hardest. Orders for same day delivery must be placed by 12:30 p.m. or by 2:30 p.m. for Madison zip codes 53704, 53714 and 53716.

 

PRODUCT SPOTLIGHTEach month we spotlight some product that we already carry or one that we’ve taken note of and plan to carry in the near future. Likewise, if you would like to see Klein’s to carry a product that we don’t currently, please let us know. Our goal is to be responsive to the marketplace and to our loyal clientele. If a product fits into our profile, we will make every effort to get it into our store. In addition, we may be able to special order an item for you, whether plant or hard good, given enough time.

 

Systemic Insect Control from Bonide
If planning on bringing any plants indoors that have spent the summer outside, it’s almost (during the first week of September) the time to begin preventative measures to avoid bringing insect pests inside along with your plants. It’s far better to begin a regular routine now than to deal with pest problems once established indoors.

 

Systemic pesticides, unlike those directly sprayed on the insect, are absorbed by the plant itself and makes the plant toxic for insects to feed on them. Soft tissued plants absorb the chemicals quicker than woody plants which require the 4-6 week period for the systemic to work. We recommend starting Labor Day weekend for application for two reasons. First off, it happens to fall in that 4-6 week window before our average killing frost. Secondly, it’s easy to remember to apply it at about the same time from year to year.

 

The Bonide systemic we sell at Klein’s comes in two sizes (the smaller size packaged for houseplants and the larger for garden plants though the exact same product in both). The systemic needs to be reapplied about every 5 weeks throughout the winter to prevent insect infestations. When one brings plants indoors, we not only bring in the adults, but also their unhatched eggs. Reapplying also prevents plant-to-plant infestations. The most common indoor plant pests controlled by the systemic include aphids, whiteflies, mealybugs, spider mites and thrips. Though mentioned on the label, we’ve found the systemic a little too mild to rid plants of scale and it seems relatively ineffective against the fungus gnats that live in the soil.

 

Carefully use the product according to package instructions; usually a few teaspoons stirred into the surface soil of your average sized potted plant. Dosage is based on pot size and soil volume, not plant size. For application, use a disposable plastic teaspoon and not a dinner spoon. Apply the systemic when the plants need to be watered and once applied, water them thoroughly. It’s not recommended to use the systemic in rooms where small children or pets have access to the treated plants.

 

NOTES FROM MY GARDEN JOURNAL–Tips and Observations from My Own Garden by Rick Halbach

 

ENTRY: AUGUST 12, 2019 (About Sandhill Cranes)
While delivering flowers and later doing errands around Madison today, I couldn’t believe the number of sandhill cranes I came across in fields, in marshes, in yards, along busy city streets or just flying overhead. They seemed to be everywhere. It’s hard to believe that at one time they were nearly extinct.

 

Sandhills are one of two crane species found in North America. The other is the whooping crane, an endangered species, which has been recently reintroduced to Wisconsin. Unlike, its white whooping crane cousin, the sandhill crane is a tall gray bird. It has a huge wingspan of 6-7 feet! While the birds are tall, they only weigh between 8 and 11 pounds. Adults have yellow eyes, black bills, legs and feet, with a bright red patch on the crest of their head. Males and females look nearly alike. In the spring, they actually “paint” their feathers with mud to camouflage themselves in brown grasses. In the summer, many people confuse them with the great blue heron since they are similar in color and nearly the same size. When you see a large bird in the sky, you’ll know it’s a sandhill crane if the neck is outstretched and the downward flap of the wings is followed by a quick upstroke. The great blue heron has a black eye stripe, flies with their neck folded back, and their wing strokes are even.

 

Sandhill cranes are on the move in fall and spring when they migrate to and from Florida where they spend the winter months. They return to Wisconsin’s marshes in March. Cranes select a mate when they are 4-years old and live as many as 25 to 30 years with the same mate. Crane families migrate south together.

 

Young birds that have outgrown their parents, hang out together in groups of 20, called a “bachelor flock.” They migrate and feed together at night in open woods and fields away from the marsh.

 

When sandhill cranes are ready to mate, they begin a unique courtship ritual. The cranes have a series of dances that they do while making calls. The dance looks like two marionette puppets frolicking delicately on strings. They alternately bow and leap into the air with wings stretched out as they circle each other. While they dance, the pair lets out a series of loud calls. The male utters a note followed quickly by the female’s two-note answer. Sometimes you can hear them from 2 miles away on quiet spring mornings. After their dance, they build a nest near open water in a grassy area. The nest is made with piles of grasses heaped across 5 feet. Females will lay one or two eggs in the nest and both birds will incubate them. Chicks are born in 30 days and have fuzzy yellow-brown feathers. They’re usually born in mid-May in Wisconsin. Birds will renest if they lose the eggs to predators. Chicks can fly by mid-July and families feed together on tubers (a swollen underground plant stem, like a potato) worms, grasshoppers, snails, frogs, seeds, and sometimes snakes, small birds and mice. Cranes can be a problem for farmers when they pull up sprouting corn in spring time and eat large amounts of farm field grain in the fall.

 

In the fall, cranes “stage” (gather together in groups of several thousand) in larger wetland areas in Wisconsin. When winter falls on the Wisconsin landscape, cold mid-November winds will carry the cranes circling up to heights of 5,000 feet to catch stiff north winds on their road to southern climates.

 

In the 1800s, sandhill cranes were in trouble. The land they lived on was destroyed by speculators and they were hunted to near extinction. In 1916, the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act was signed, protecting the remaining birds in Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota and Ontario, Canada. A central area in Wisconsin was set aside to give the birds a place to breed. Today, the crane population is in good shape, benefiting from habitat restoration projects around the state.

 

 

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ENTRY: AUGUST 14, 2019 (Gardening Success: Art vs. Science)
This has been a phenomenal summer in the garden. The heat and sunshine have allowed the plants to grow large and healthy. The lack of storms, wind and hail has left the foliage beautiful and and unblemished. And the relative absence of mosquitoes this summer (in comparison to last year) has allowed us to enjoy the beauty of the garden more than any summer before.

 

Friends and coworkers often debate about what makes a garden beautiful. Ultimately it all comes down to one’s own personal taste and an atmosphere that makes one happiest. For some, design is more important than anything else. For others it’s all about the accessories–the art, the structures, the knick-knacks, the containers, the water features. And for others (like me) it’s simply about the plants. For most people, it’s a mix of all of the above that makes up the perfect garden.

 

Recently while showing some friends around the yard, one of my friends commented on how talented I am artistically with my arrangement of plants in the gardens and in containers and the stunning color combinations. I found her comments fascinating. From my perspective, the beauty of my garden comes down to simply knowing about the plants I grow and their very particular needs. That same friend might have a very different opinion of my ‘artistic talent’ were she to visit my garden in late May. She’d see my now-hidden-by-foliage, hodgepodge collection of old, stained plastic and chipped clay pots. She’d wonder what on earth was he thinking with his odd and haphazard plant placement. Why did he put taller plants in front of shorter ones? Why are ugly containers scattered throughout his perennial beds? Who in the world plants parsley, impatiens and butterfly bushes in the same container? What’s up with that? Talent?

 

For me, it’s the science of the plants that makes my garden a success (and beautiful). I’m diligent about watering and feeding. I place plants in my garden not by design, but by knowing their light requirements, watering needs and most importantly; what the plants will look like four months after I planted them in May. Because I do my homework and know the plants I grow so well, I no longer make the mistakes I made when I began gardening nearly 30 years ago. The color combinations are more coincidence than planning. I place plants where I know the’ll grow best, rather than purchasing plants to fit a plan, design or color scheme. I purchase and grow the plants that I enjoy growing, knowing that I’ll find some place in the yard that will accommodate them.

 

So it’s August now, and as always, with good weather, some TLC and time to grow, the garden has come together beautifully–little artistic talent involved.

 

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ENTRY: AUGUST 28, 2019 (Growing Cotton Is Fun and Educational)
Probably the most interesting and fun plant I’m growing in my garden this year is cotton (Gossypium herbaceum). Until a few years back, I had never seen a cotton plant before. The whole experience of growing cotton was so fascinating—beginning to end. The plants are easy to grow and fit so well into my mixed annual and tropical combinations. I’m growing two large containers of cotton, two plants per pot, placed in a sunny spot on the back deck. The 3-4’ plants are very dense with glossy and beautiful, maple-like foliage. Pale yellow flowers have appeared almost daily for the entire summer. The hibiscus-like blooms turn a pale pink as they mature. Like most members of the mallow family, blooms last just one day.

 

Later in summer and early fall, the plants are will be loaded with large, hard seedpods called bolls. When I grew black cotton a few years ago, the bolls burst open once the weather got cold in mid-October, releasing the cotton balls we all recognize (though each ball was loaded with tiny cotton seeds).

 

This past spring season, Klein’s carried two cotton plant varieties from Garden Geeks™; the black type I had previously grown and a beautiful variegated type with leaves of green, splashed in pink and red.

 

KLEIN’S RECIPES OF THE MONTHThese are a selection of relatively simple recipes chosen by our staff. New recipes appear monthly. Enjoy!!

 

Edamame: Japanese for “beans on a branch”. If ever you’ve received this delectable edible soybean from one of our many local CSA’s, you surely know this to be an accurate description. Typically one receives the entire plant, literally dripping with these fuzzy, podded beans. Only recently have edible soybeans made their appearance at nearly all supermarkets. They are most commonly found in the frozen vegetable aisle–both whole and shelled. The best way to describe the flavor is “naturally buttery”. Shelled beans are delicious on their own per package instructions. However, the best way to experience edamame is fresh, in the pod, and as the natives do. Simply drop the edamame, shell and all, into a pot of salted, boiling water for five to eight minutes. Drain well, dump them into a bowl and slip the tender beans out of the pod between your front teeth, disposing of the shell. It’s great fun for young and old alike and makes for a great and very healthy snack.

 

SOYBEAN HUMMUS–From Cooking Light magazine, July 2006
2 cups frozen shelled edamame
1/2 cup water
6 TBS. olive oil
4 TBS. fresh lemon juice
2 tsp. salt
2 cloves minced garlic
1/4 tsp. Tobasco sauce
4 TBS. chopped parsley
Pita, crackers or fresh veggie dippers

 

Combine the edamame and water in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer 10 minutes. Drain. Combine the cooked beans, oil, juice , salt, garlic and Tobasco in a food processor and process until smooth. Add the parsley and process until just blended.

 

EDAMAME & BARLEY SALAD–Another recipe from the same issue of Cooking Light magazine as above.
Dressing:
5 TBS. olive oil
1 TBS. lemon zest
2 TBS. lemon juice
1 TBS. Dijon mustard
1/2 tsp. pepper

 

Salad:
1 cup pearled barley
1 cup chopped red bell pepper
3/4 cup chopped red onion
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
1/4 cup chopped fresh mint
1 1/4 tsp. salt
1x 16 oz. bag frozen shelled edamame, thawed

 

Whisk together the dressing ingredients and set aside. Cook the barley per package instructions. Combine the cooked barley, bell pepper, onion and the rest of the ingredients in a large bowl and toss well. Add the dressing and toss gently to coat. Allow to rest 15 minutes or chill before serving. Serves 8.

 

SOY WASABI SPREAD–This recipe appeared in Martha Stewart Living from July of 2005.
16 oz. frozen, shelled edamame
8 oz. silken tofu
1 tsp. lemon zest
2 TBS. fresh lemon juice
1 TBS. Chinese hot mustard
2 tsp. wasabi paste
1 tsp. course salt
Crackers, cucumber slices &/or carrot sticks for serving

 

Bring a pot of water to a boil. Add the edamame and cook 5 minutes. Drain and rinse in cold water. Drain again. Puree the edamame, tofu, zest, juice, mustard, wasabi and salt in a food processor and serve. Makes 3 cups.

 

SEAFOOD MEDLEY—This simple dish served over pasta is certain to become a family favorite. One of a Klein’s staff member’s go-to and quick dinner recipes.
1 clove minced garlic
1/2 cup diced onion
1 red pepper, diced
1x 8 oz. can tomato sauce
1x 15 oz. can diced tomatoes with the juice
1 1/2 tsp. (or less) Tobasco
2 tsp. dried basil
2 tsp. dried oregano
1/2 tsp. black pepper
1 cup frozen shelled edamame
1x 16 oz. pkg. imitation crab meat, thawed and broken into bite sized pieces
6 oz. tomato juice, clam juice or water for added liquid, if desired
1x 16 oz. pkg. rotini, rotelle or similar pasta, cooked per package instructions
Parmesan

 

Sauté the garlic, onion and pepper in a little olive oil until tender. Add all the ingredients except the pasta, stir and simmer over medium-low heat for 10-15 minutes. Serve over the cooked pasta, sprinkled with parmesan. Serves 4.

 

EDAMAME WITH ASIAN SAUCE–And yet another delicious recipe from From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce.
1 lb. fresh edamame in the shell
2 TBS. soy sauce
1 TBS. sesame oil
1 TBS. canola oil
1 TBS. rice vinegar
2 cloves minced garlic
1 tsp. brown sugar or honey
2 TBS. sesame seeds

 

Boil the edamame in salted water 5-8 minutes. Combine the other ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a simmer, stirring, to dissolve the sugar or honey. Toss with the hot, cooked and drained edamame. Serve immediately. This sauce also works well tossed with cooked, shelled edamame. Serves 6.

 

NATURAL NEWS–

 

Lily Leaf Beetle Spreading in Wisconsin
By Lisa Johnson for the Wisconsin State Journal, August 11, 2019 @ madison.com

 

Lily leaf beetle spreading in Wisconsin: The lily leaf beetle (LLB), Lilioceris lilii, is a small, bright red beetle native to Europe and Eurasia; it is believed to have arrived in the U.S. via lily bulbs shipped from Europe. Since LLB is not a U.S. native, it has no natural enemies, which assists in its spread. It was first detected in Wisconsin in 2014 in Marathon County, but has now spread to nine other counties including Wood, Portage, Shawano, Langlade, Lincoln, Oneida, Taylor, Door and recently, Dane County. The adult beetle, though small (¼ to ½ inch long) is very visible: it is bright scarlet-red with a black head, antennae, legs and underside. Adult females lay eggs mostly on two members of the lily family: true lilies (genus Lilium) and fritillaries (genus Fritillaria). True lilies include Asiatic, Oriental, Easter, Turk’s cap, Orienpet, trumpet and tiger lilies, as well as native lilies such as the wood lily. True lilies don’t include canna lilies, calla lilies, or daylilies. LLB feeds on lilies and fritillaries primarily, but they also feed on Solomon’s seal and flowering tobacco plants (genus Polygonatum and genus Nicotiana). Asiatic lily hybrids appear to be most susceptible to LLB, but some Oriental varieties seem resistant. The insect overwinters as an adult in soil near the plants it feeds on and emerges early spring through June. Females can lay up to 450 eggs on the underside of lily or fritillaria leaves. The orange to light green larvae appear slug-like, and cover themselves with their own feces to make them less appealing to predators. The larvae feed for 16-24 days, then pupate in the soil. The fluorescent orange pupae emerge as adult beetles in 16-22 days. LLB can be controlled via a variety of organic methods. These include hand-picking the insects and depositing them into a bucket of soapy water, using insecticidal soap and neem oil. Caution should be taken when applying the soap or oil during very hot weather due to potential phytotoxicity.

 

Other traditional contact insecticides include products containing permethrin, pyrethrins, cyhalothrin, or deltamethrin. Follow all label instructions as required by law.

 

If you think you have found lily leaf beetle, submit a sample to PJ Liesch at the Insect Diagnostic Lab on the UW-Madison campus or contact Liz Meils at the state Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) as the spread of this insect is being tracked. The email at DATCP is [email protected]. You can also contact your local UW-Extension office.

 

Lisa Johnson, Dane County UW-Extension horticulture educator

 

SEPTEMBER’S PLANT OF THE MONTH:

 

MANGAVE
Manfreda x Agave = Mangave

 

Mangave is an intergeneric hybrid, and Mangave inherits the best of its parents. Agave lends durability and large, architectural form. Manfreda gives unique coloring and spotting, as well as softer spines that make them easy to handle.

 

Mangave is a tender perennial or “temperennial” succulent plant. These hybrid plants are relatively new and don’t behave like normal succulents. While you can grow and treat them like the average succulent plant, there are differences and benefits to properly grow a Mangave.

 

There are many ways in which Mangave compare to normal succulents. Both of these plants prefer a well-drained, dry to average soil and should be situated in containers just slightly wider than the width of the rosette. The majority of succulents, Mangave included, are best when situated in full sun or an area with a lot of natural light. However, Mangave can also be planted directly in the ground and add tremendous landscape value.

 

We think of succulents as drought tolerant, but really they are water sensitive. Too much water and they rot away, too little and they don’t grow. Enter Mangave. This super-sized succulent is much more water tolerant and grows much quicker because of it. Happy with your Mangave at the size it is? Water it sparingly like a normal succulent to slow it down.

 

Agave and Manfreda are native from the Southeastern United States through to South America. You will probably never find a Mangave growing in the wild because of how infrequently both Agave and Manfreda flower, making cross pollination unlikely. It is thanks to the collectors and hybridizers of unique plants that this original cross was possible.

 

Mangave are unlike most succulents who either don’t get that big or take a long period of time to fill a container. Their fast growth rate, interesting colors, and architecture allow Mangave to fill large pots and patio containers. Use them in combination with other succulents or to stand alone in a mono pot.

 

It is best to plant a Mangave in a well drained soil. If a Mangave is allowed to sit wet for too long the roots may begin to rot. Mangave grown in containers should be planted with a succulent or bark soil mix. Sandy or rocky soils are among the best if you are placing your Mangave directly into the ground. If you are worried your soil is too heavy or has too much water, you can try amending the area around your Mangave with a succulent or bark soil mix.

 

If you do not live in an area where a Mangave will naturally overwinter, you will need to bring it inside to an environment that is kept at 60° F or warmer. You should also place it in an area where it will get as much natural light as possible. If your Mangave is closeted away from a good light source it will begin to stretch and the leaves will lose their substance.

 

Klein’s currently has a nice selection of Mangave in 4” pots with our indoor succulent plants. Choices include; Mission to Mars, Moonglow,
Pineapple Express and Spotty Dotty

 

Source: Mad About Mangave® @ madaboutmangave.com

 

AROUND TOWN:
For neighborhood events or garden tours that you would like posted in our monthly newsletter, please contact Rick at (608) 244-5661 or [email protected]. Please include all details, i.e. dates, locations, prices, brief description, etc. Events must be garden related and must take place in the Madison vicinity and we must receive your information by the first of the month in which the event takes place for it to appear in that month’s newsletter.

 

Guided Garden Strolls
Sundays, May 5 thru October 13, 1:30-3:00

 

Get an insider’s view of Olbrich’s outdoor gardens during a free guided garden stroll. All ages are welcome for this casual overview of the Gardens. Guided garden strolls will vary somewhat according to the season to reflect the garden areas that are at peak interest.

 

Strolls start and end in the lobby near the Garden entrance and are about 45 to 60 minutes in length. No registration is required; strolls are drop-in only. Strolls are held rain or shine and will be cancelled only in the event of dangerous lightning.

 

Olbrich Botanical Gardens
608/246-4550 or www.olbrich.org for details.

 

GLEAM, Art in a New Light
August 28 thru October 26, 2019
Wednesdays thru Saturdays in September from 7:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. in October, rain or shine
In the gardens @ Olbrich Botanical Gardens

 

Definition: Gleam n. a flash of light; n. an appearance of reflected light; v. shine brightly like a star or light; v. appear briefly

 

GLEAM, Art in a New Light, is an annual exhibit featuring local, national and international artists creating light-based installations throughout Olbrich’s 16-acre outdoor gardens. Visitors wind their way through dimly lit pathways, encountering strange and surprising forms that pulse and shimmer in the night around every corner.
Experience the gardens after dark in a whole new light!

 

GLEAM will be viewable daily, during regular public daytime hours in September and October. When the sun sets, the Gardens will open for extended viewing hours and art installations will be illuminated.

 

Admission for the general public is $15 for adults 13 & up ($11 for members) and $7 for children ages 3-12 ($6 for members).

 

Tickets available at the door starting at 7:30 p.m. pending online ticket sales. Gardens will close to the public at 6 p.m. on evening viewing dates. Last ticket sold at 10 p.m. (9:00 in October).

 

Olbrich Botanical Gardens
608/246-4550 or www.olbrich.org for details.

 

Garden Excursion
Sunday,September 1, 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Walk

 

Learn about Arboretum history, land, and science on a gently paced walk in the gardens. This new monthly stroll offers a multigenerational learning experience on the first Sunday of each month, April–October. Free, no registration required. Meet at the Visitor Center.

 

University of WI Arboretum
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

Fall Flowers in Grady Oak Savanna and Greene Prairie
Sunday, September 1, 1:00-3:00 p.m.

 

Enjoy goldenrods, asters, sunflowers, gentians, and the many insects living among them. Free, no registration required. Meet at Grady Tract parking lot, southeast corner of Seminole Hwy. and W. Beltline Frontage Rd. No facilities on site; some sloping terrain.

 

University of WI Arboretum
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

2019 Summer Sundays: Concerts in the Garden at Allen Centennial Garden
Add a little bit of musical enjoyment to your Sunday afternoons this summer with Summer Sundays: Concerts in the Garden. This concert series will feature some of the best musical groups in Madison ranging from classical to jazz chamber music. The concerts will be held alternating Sunday afternoons starting June 23 and ending September 1, from 5-6:15 p.m.

 

This event is free and open to the public. Brought to you by the Friends of Allen Centennial Garden.

 

September 1
Golpe Tierra
The irresistible acoustic groove of Golpe Tierra again kicks off Summer Sundays 2019! Nick Moran, Juan Tomas Martinez, Tony Barba, and Richard Hildner make up this guerrilla-style ensemble, employing the traditional Afro-Peruvian guitar-bass-cajón set-up. The group embarks on a musical journey throughout Latin-America, flirting with blues, jazz, and shades of soul. This uniquely- presented original and traditional music is sure to get you out of your seat to dance!

 

Allen Centennial Gardens
620 Babcock Dr. on the University of WI campus, Madison
608/576-2501 or allencentennialgarden.org for details.

 

Rotary Gardens 2019 Fall Plant and Mum Sales
Saturday, September 7 from 8 AM to 12 PM (Mums Only)
Thursday, September 12 from 4:30 PM to 7:30 PM (Members-only)
Friday, September 13 from 9 AM to 6 PM
Saturday, September 14 from 8 AM to 5 PM
Sunday, September 15 from 10 AM to 4 PM
Monday, September 16 from 8 AM to 5 PM (Clearance Sale)
Saturday, September 21 from 8 AM to 12 PM (Mums Only)
At the Horticulture Center, 825 Sharon Rd., Janesville

 

Shoppers will be able to find an assortment of mums, kale, perennials, shrubs and compost during the sale. RBG volunteers will be available to assist shoppers with questions and purchases.

 

Those with a valid Rotary Botanical Gardens membership card will receive 10% off their total purchase. Memberships will be available for purchase at the plant sale.

 

Rotary Botanical Gardens
608/752-3885 or www.rotarybotanicalgardens.org/ for details.

 

Family Walk: Fungus Among Us
Sunday, September 8, 1:30-2:30 p.m.

 

The season is right to observe mushrooms and other types of fungus. Learn about the important roles they play in nature on a naturalist-led walk designed for children ages 3–11. Free, no registration required. Meet at the Visitor Center.

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

Community Hummingbird Garden Tours
Wednesday, September 11, 3:00-7:00 p.m.
Sunday, September 15, 1:00-5:30 p.m.
5118 Buffalo Trail, Madison, 53705 (near Hilldale & Oscar Rennebohm Park)

 

One of Wisconsin’s Hummingbird Banders, Mickey O’Connor, will be banding hummingbirds on both tour dates. Additionally, Larry and Emily Scheunemann will present a program about hummingbirds on both tour dates. We have 100+ plants and shrubs on display (including some rare salvias from South America), 20 hummingbird feeders, a garden pond and a door prize drawing on each day with birding related items donated by Wildbirds Unlimited in Middleton. We will also provide printed information about hummingbird gardening.

 

For more info please contact Kathi or Michael Rock at [email protected].

 

 

Native Garden Tour:
Fall in the Native Plant Garden
Saturday, September 14, 1:00-3:00 p.m.

 

Color, fruits, seeds, late-blooming plants, late-season insects—we will find these and more in the diverse native plant gardens around the Visitor Center. Susan Carpenter, Arboretum Native Plant Gardener, will lead this tour. Free, no registration required. Meet at the Visitor Center.

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

Native By Design:
Gardening for a Sustainable Future
Sunday, September 15, 8:45 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

 

The annual Native Gardening Conference teaches and promotes the use of native plants in home landscapes for biodiversity, habitat, beauty, and sustainability. Expert-led workshops inspire and inform gardeners and landowners to create and maintain native gardens or small-scale restorations. Keynote: “Native Plants in Urban Settings,” Lynn Steiner, garden writer. Fee: $65. This conference is sold out. Call (608) 262-2445 for waiting list.

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888 or arboretum.wisc.edu

 

Herb Fair
Saturday, September 21, 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
Goodman Community Center
214 Waubesa St., Madison, WI

 

The American Herb Guild Southern Wisconsin Chapter, with its sponsors Community Pharmacy, Frontier Co-op, Mountain Rose Herbs, and Willy St. C-op will host this annual Herb Fair. on September 21st at the Goodman Community Center, 214 Waubesa St., from 10:00 am – 3:00 pm. Admittance, with talks, guided herb walks, and a marketplace, is free and open to all. Please contact Mary at [email protected], or check www.facebook.com/SoWisAHG/ for updates.

 

Crackle–Fire & Froth in the Gardens
Fridays, September 27 & October 4, 7:00-10:00 p.m.
Olbrich Botanical Gardens

 

Be inspired by the beauty of a crisp fall evening in Olbrich’s outdoor gardens. Watch the flames from bonfires dance on the Great Lawn, groove to live music, savor a variety of tasty foods from Food Fight restaurants, and sip frothy Wisconsin brews. Food and beverage offered at an additional cost.

 

Must be 21 years old to attend. In the case of inclement weather the event will be relocated indoors. A limited number of advance tickets are available. Additional tickets may be available the day of the event, weather permitting. Tickets are available both at Olbrich’s Growing Gifts shop or on-line beginning September 3. Ticket proceeds benefit the Gardens. Tickets are $25 ($20 for members).

 

Olbrich Botanical Gardens
3330 Atwood Ave., Madison
608/246-4550 or www.olbrich.org for details.

 

Dane County Farmer’s Market
Saturdays, April 13 thru November 16, 6:15-1:45
On the Capitol Square

 

Wednesdays, April 17 thru November 6, 8:30-1:45
In the 200 block of Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.

 

For details visit www.dcfm.org

 

Northside Farmers Market
Sundays, May 5 through October 20, 8:30-12:30
In the Northside TownCenter at the intersection of N. Sherman Ave. and Northport Dr. across from Warner Park.

 

The Northside Farmers Market is a nonprofit community enterprise. It is one of the newest and fastest growing farmers’ markets in Dane County. In keeping with the innovative spirit of Madison’s Northside, we are surpassing what defines the traditional farmers’ market. Our fundamental principles include:

 

–Providing an abundant selection of high quality, locally grown foods.
The market accepts Quest, WIC and Senior FMNP vouchers.

 

–Supporting our local agricultural entrepreneurs who are increasingly important today in ensuring that we have the best and safest food possible.

 

–Educating the community about traditional foods and the history of local agriculture in an attempt to preserve (and expand upon) our rich heritage.

 

–Promoting nutrition and the market by hosting dinners for neighborhood groups and seniors.

 

Parking is always FREE!

 

 

SEPTEMBER IN THE GARDEN-A checklist of things to do this month.
___Continue sowing lettuce, endive, escarole and spinach.
___Plant garlic now! This is the best time in Wisconsin.
___Plant bearded iris rhizomes and transplant peonies.
___Harvest pumpkins and winter squash.
___Apply a systemic pesticide to plants to be wintered over indoors.
___Continue planting shrubs and trees.
___Plant grass seed. September is one of the best times as nights cool.
___Aerate your lawn.
___Divide and plant perennials as desired.
___Stop deadheading perennials for winter interest, i.e. sedums, grasses, etc.
___Dig tender bulbs as the foliage yellows.
___Give the garden at least 1” of moisture per week.
___Collect seeds for next year’s garden.
___Make notes in your garden journal for changes, improvements, etc.
___Take pictures of your garden for record keeping.
___Keep and eye on the weather. Water as needed.
___Shop for spring bulbs, mums and pansies.
___Bring dormant amaryllis bulb indoors for 3 mo. of rest.
___Begin checking out the garden centers for spring bulb selection.
___Take cuttings of geraniums, coleus and other plants to winter over.
___Late in the month, begin planting spring bulbs, but wait as long as possible.
___Begin moving houseplants back indoors.
___Visit Klein’s—Great selection of mums, kales, cabbages, pansies & more!

 

Some of our very favorite seed and plant sources include:

 

For seeds:
Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds @ www.rareseeds.com or 417/924-8887
Burpee @ www.burpee.com or 800/888-1447
Harris Seeds @ www.harrisseeds.com or 800/514-4441
Johnny’s Select Seeds @ www.johnnyseeds.com or 207/861-3901
Jung’s Seeds @ www.jungseed.com or 800/247-5864
Park’s Seeds @ www.parkseed.com or 800/845-3369
Pinetree @ www.superseeds.com or 207/926-3400
Seeds of Change @ www.seedsofchange.com or 888/762-7333
Seed Savers @ www.seedsavers.org or 563/382-5990
Select Seeds @ www.selectseeds.com or 800/684-0395
Territorial Seeds @ www.territorialseed.com or 888/657-3131
Thompson & Morgan @ www.thompson-morgan.com or 800/274-7333

 

For bulbs:
Brent & Becky’s Bulbs @ www.brentandbeckysbulbs.com or 877/661-2852
Colorblends @ www.colorblends.com or 888/847-8637
John Scheeper’s @ www.johnscheepers.com or 860/567-0838
McClure & Zimmerman @ www.mzbulb.com or 800/883-6998

 

For plants:
High Country Gardens @ www.highcountrygardens.com or 800/925-9387
Logee’s Greenhouses @ www.logees.com or 888/330-8038
Plant Delights Nursery @ www.plantdelights.com or 912/772-4794
Roots and Rhizomes @ www.rootsrhizomes.com or 800/374-5035
Wayside Gardens @ www.waysidegardens.com or 800/213-0379
White Flower Farm @ www.whiteflowerfarm.com or 800/503-9624

 

BEHIND THE SCENES AT KLEIN’SThis is a sneak peek of what is going on each month behind the scenes in our greenhouses. Many people are unaware that our facility operates year round or that we have 10 more greenhouses on the property in addition to the 6 open for retail. At any given moment we already have a jump on the upcoming season–be it poinsettias in July, geraniums in December or fall mums in May.

 

IN SEPTEMBER:
—The poinsettias continue grow and thrive in our back greenhouses. They’re almost ready to bring into our retail greenhouses before the weather gets too cold.

 

—Crops arrive for winter sales: cyclamen, azaleas.

 

—We begin weatherizing the greenhouses for winter.

 

—All remaining perennials are cut back, cleaned up and put into winter storage.

 

—We continue stocking fall mums as they go into bloom. We’ll continue to have a good selection into November.

 

—Ordering plants for spring 2020 is going on fast and furious. Our growers order early to ensure best selection. They pore over stacks of catalogs containing the newest plant material for 2020.

 

PERMANENT FEATURES–
KLEIN’S MONTHLY NEWSLETTER
Have our monthly newsletter e-mailed to you automatically by signing up on the right side of our home page. We’ll offer monthly tips, greenhouse news and tidbits, specials and recipes. . .everything you need to know from your favorite Madison greenhouse. And tell your friends. It’s easy to do.

 

THE MAD GARDENER–“Madison’s Firsthand Source for Expert Gardening Advice”
Ask us your gardening questions by e-mailing us at [email protected]. Klein’s in-house Mad Gardener will e-mail you with an answer as promptly as we can. The link is posted on our home page and in all newsletters.

 

We can only answer those questions pertaining to gardening in Southern Wisconsin and we reserve the right to leave correspondence unanswered at our discretion. Please allow 2-3 days for a response.

 

TO WRITE A REVIEW OF KLEIN’S, PLEASE LINK TO

 

FACEBOOK
Follow Klein’s on Facebook where we post updates and photos on a regular basis.

 

TWITTER
Join Klein’s on Twitter where we post company updates and photos on a regular basis.

 

SENIOR CITIZEN DISCOUNT
We offer a 10% Off Senior Citizen Discount every Tuesday to those 62 and above. This discount is not in addition to other discounts or sales. Please mention that you are a senior before we ring up your purchases. Does not apply to wire out orders or services, i.e. delivery, potting, etc.

 

RECYCLING POTS & TRAYS
Plastic flower pots and garden edging can now be recycled as part of the City of Madison’s rigid plastic program. Flowerpots and edging must be free of dirt and can be placed in your green recycling bin. For more information call 267-2626 or visit www.cityofmadison.com/streets/recycling/plastic.cfm

 

DELIVERY INFO

Klein’s Floral and Greenhouses delivers daily, except Sundays, throughout all of Madison and much of Dane County including: Cottage Grove, DeForest, Fitchburg, Maple Bluff, Marshall, McFarland, Middleton, Monona, Oregon, Shorewood Hills, Sun Prairie, Verona, Waunakee and Windsor. We do not deliver to Cambridge, Columbus, Deerfield or Stoughton.

Current delivery rate on 1-4 items is $7.95 for Madison, Maple Bluff, Monona and Shorewood Hills; $8.95 for Cottage Grove, DeForest, Fitchburg, McFarland, Sun Prairie, Waunakee and Windsor; and $9.95 for Marshall, Middleton, Oregon and Verona. An additional $3.00 will be added for deliveries of 4-10 items and $5.00 added for deliveries of more than 10 items. For deliveries requiring more than one trip, a separate delivery charge will be added for each trip.

 

A minimum order of $25.00 is required for delivery.

We not only deliver our fabulous fresh flowers, but also houseplants, bedding plants and hardgoods. There may be an extra charge for very large or bulky items.

Delivery to the Madison hospitals is $5.95. Deliveries to the four Madison hospitals are made during the early afternoon. Items are delivered to the hospital’s volunteer rooms and not directly to the patients’ rooms per hospital rules.

There is no delivery charge for funerals in the city of Madison or Monona, although normal rates apply for morning funeral deliveries to Madison’s west side (west of Park St.). Our normal rates also apply for funeral deliveries in the surrounding communities at all times. Although we don’t deliver on Sundays, we will deliver funeral items on Sundays at the regular delivery rate.

 

Morning delivery is guaranteed to the following Madison zip codes, but only if requested: 53703, 53704, 53714, 53716, 53718 and Cottage Grove, DeForest, Maple Bluff, Marshall, McFarland, Monona, Sun Prairie, Waunakee and Windsor.

We begin our delivery day at 8:00 a.m. and end at approximately 3:00 p.m. We do not usually deliver after 4:00 unless specific exceptions are made with our drivers.

Except for holidays, the following west-side zip codes and communities are delivered only during the afternoon: 53705, 53706, 53711, 53713, 53717, 53719, 53726, Fitchburg, Middleton, Oregon, Shorewood Hills and Verona.

During holidays (Christmas, Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day, etc.) we are able to make morning deliveries to all of the above areas. We are not able to take closely timed deliveries on any holiday due to the sheer volume of such requests.

It’s best to give us a range of time and we’ll try our absolute hardest. Orders for same day delivery must be placed by 12:30 p.m. or by 2:30 p.m. for Madison zip codes 53704 and 53714.

 

DEPARTMENT HEADS: Please refer all questions, concerns or feedback in the following departments to their appropriate supervisor.
Phone: 608/244-5661 or 888/244-5661

 

Horticulturalist & General Manager–Jamie VandenWymelenberg [email protected]
Accounts, Billing and Purchasing—Kathryn Derauf [email protected]
Delivery Supervisor & Newsletter Coordinator—Rick Halbach [email protected]
Owner, Floral Designer & Purchasing—Sue Klein [email protected]

 

RELATED RESOURCES AND WEB SITES
University of Wisconsin Extension
1 Fen Oak Ct. #138
Madison, WI 53718
608/224-3700

 

Plant Disease Diagnostics Clinic
Dept. of Plant Pathology
1630 Linden Dr.
Madison, WI 53706

 

Insect Diagnostic Lab
240 Russell Labs
1630 Linden Dr.
Madison, WI 53706

 

U.W. Soil and Plant Analysis Lab
8452 Mineral Point Rd.
Verona, WI 53593
608/262-4364

 

American Horticultural Society

 

Garden Catalogs (an extensive list with links)

 

Invasive Species

 

Community Groundworks
3601 Memorial Dr., Ste. 4
Madison, WI 53704
608/240-0409

 

Madison Area Master Gardeners (MAMGA)

 

Wisconsin Master Gardeners Program
Department of Horticulture
1575 Linden Drive
University of Wisconsin – Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608/265-4504

 

The Wisconsin Gardener

 

Allen Centennial Gardens
620 Babcock Dr.
Madison, WI 53706
608/262-8406

 

Olbrich Botanical Gardens
3330 Atwood Ave.
Madison, WI 53704
608/246-4550

 

Rotary Gardens
1455 Palmer Dr.
Janesville, WI 53545
608/752-3885

 

University of WI Arboretum
1207 Seminole Hwy.
Madison, WI 53711
608/263-7888

 

University of Wisconsin-West Madison
Agricultural Research Center
8502 Mineral Point Rd.
Verona, WI 53593
608/262-2257

 

PLANTS POISONOUS TO CHILDREN:
Children may find the bright colors and different textures of plants irresistible, but some plants can be poisonous if touched or eaten. If you’re in doubt about whether or not a plant is poisonous, don’t keep it in your home. The risk is not worth it. The following list is not comprehensive, so be sure to seek out safety information on the plants in your home to be safe.
•Bird of paradise
•Bull nettle
•Castor bean
•Chinaberry tree
•Crocus
•Daffodil
•Deadly nightshade
•Dieffenbachia (dumb cane)
•Foxglove
•Glory lily
•Hemlock
•Holly berry
•Indian tobacco
•Iris
•Jimsonweed
•Lantana
•Larkspur
•Lily of the valley
•Marijuana
•Mescal bean
•Mexicantes
•Mistletoe
•Morning glory
•Mountain laurel
•Night-blooming jasmine
•Nutmeg
•Oleander
•Philodendron
•Poison ivy
•Poison sumac
•Pokeweed
•Poppy
•Potato
•Privet
•Rhododendron
•Rhubarb
•Water hemlock
•Wisteria

 

PLANTS POISONOUS TO PETS:
Below is a list of some of the common plants which may produce a toxic reaction in animals. This list is intended only as a guide to plants which are generally identified as having the capability for producing a toxic reaction. Source: The National Humane Society website @ http://www.humanesociety.org/
•Aconite
•Apple
•Arrowgrasses
•Autumn Crocus
•Azaleas
•Baneberry
•Bird-of-Paradise
•Black locust
•Bloodroot
•Box
•Buckeye
•Buttercup
•Caladium
•Carolina jessamine
•Castor bean
•Chinaberry tree
•Chockcherries
•Christmas berry
•Christmas Rose
•Common privet
•Corn cockle
•Cowbane
•Cow cockle
•Cowsliprb
•Daffodil
•Daphne
•Day lily
•Delphinium (Larkspur)
•Dumbcane
•Dutchman’s breeches
•Easter lily
•Elderberry
•Elephant’s ear
•English Ivy
•European Bittersweet
•Field peppergrass
•Foxglove
•Holly
•Horsechestnut
•Horse nettle
•Hyacinth
•Iris
•Jack-in-the-pulpit
•Jerusalem Cherry
•Jimsonweed
•Lantana
•Larkspur
•Laurels
•Lily of the valley
•Lupines
•Mayapple
•Milk vetch
•Mistletoe
•Monkshood
•Morning glory
•Mustards
•Narcissus
•Nicotiana
•Nightshade
•Oaks
•Oleander
•Philodendrons
•Pokeweed
•Poinsettia
•Poison hemlock
•Potato
•Rhododendron
•Rhubarb
•Rosary pea
•Sago palm
•Skunk cabbage
•Smartweeds
•Snow-on-the-mountain
•Sorghum
•Star of Bethlehem
•Wild black cherry
•Wild radish
•Wisteria
•Yellow jessamine
•Yew